Technology & Digital Life

All Tech Considered
2:01 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Niche Online Dating Promises A Different Site For Every Preference

The Sayles family on their farm in Michigan. Julie and Rick Sayles met through the site FarmersOnly.com five years ago.
Courtesy of Iryshe Photography

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 8:45 pm

The numbers show Americans are getting more comfortable with online dating — a recent Pew survey found at least 11 percent of us have tried to find a match on the Internet. And the places to cyberdate are proliferating. No fewer than 1,500 dating sites are available in the U.S. to help singles connect, many for a fee.

But these days, we're not just online dating; we're niche online dating, with specific sites for singles of all stripes.

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The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Scientists Say Their Giant Laser Has Produced Nuclear Fusion

The National Ignition Facility's 192 laser beams focus onto a tiny target.
LLNL

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 9:00 pm

Researchers at a laboratory in California say they've had a breakthrough in producing fusion reactions with a giant laser. The success comes after years of struggling to get the laser to work and is another step in the decades-long quest for fusion energy.

Omar Hurricane, a researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, says that for the first time, they've produced significant amounts of fusion by zapping a target with their laser. "We've gotten more energy out of the fusion fuel than we put into the fusion fuel," he says.

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All Tech Considered
11:19 am
Wed February 12, 2014

Weekly Un-Innovation: There's Nothing To See Here

You saw Nothing.
Milan Vermeulen Courtesy of Nothing

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 2:10 pm

In our Weekly Innovation series, we pick an interesting idea, design or product that you may not know about yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use our form.

Normally we cover high-tech innovations in the form of gadgets that are supposed to make your life easier. But today, we're writing about ... Nothing.

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All Tech Considered
1:08 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

Being An 'Octodad' Is A Hilarious Lesson In Controlled Chaos

In Octodad: Dadliest Catch, you play a mild-mannered octopus living in a human world, struggling to keep your cephalopod secret from your family.
Young Horses, Inc.

Originally published on Sat February 15, 2014 6:00 pm

Great comedy is sometimes hard to find, and great comedy in a video game is even rarer. But the new game Octodad: Dadliest Catch is a "Theater of the Absurd" for the gaming crowd, and it certainly does not fail to entertain. From the title alone you know you are in for something completely silly.

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The Protojournalist
11:38 am
Tue February 11, 2014

We Are Just Not Here Anymore

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 4:56 pm

At weddings, guests tweet real-time photos of the festivities to friends far away. At sporting events, fans follow scores of games in other cities. In classrooms, students text with friends in other classes and parents out in the world. At funerals, mourners send out selfies to pals in other places.

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All Tech Considered
10:40 am
Tue February 11, 2014

The Internet Flexes Political Muscle With Anti-NSA Protest

Thousands of websites participating in the "Day We Fight Back" will show this banner, or something similar, to site visitors.
Courtesy of Demand Progress

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 1:27 pm

Reddit, Tumblr and Mozilla are among nearly 6,000 websites participating in "The Day We Fight Back," an online protest Tuesday against government surveillance.

The goal of the protest, organizers say, is partly to pass a federal bill called the USA Freedom Act, which is intended to rein in the mass surveillance programs by the National Security Agency that were exposed by Edward Snowden.

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Around the Nation
3:38 am
Tue February 11, 2014

With An Air Bag, Help During An Avalanche Is A Cord-Yank Away

Derick Noffsinger models a deployed avalanche air bag pack made by Black Diamond at an industry market in Salt Lake City last month.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 11:03 am

Let's say you're skiing in the backcountry, looking for some powder — but instead, you trigger an avalanche.

If you have an avalanche air bag pack strapped to your back, you just yank the cord. That deploys the air bag, which keeps you close to the surface and easier to dig out, says Andy Wenberg with Backcountry Access, one of several companies making the devices. When deployed, his company's version of the air bag comes out like wings.

"The whole idea when you deploy that thing in an avalanche is you're avoiding burial death," he says.

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All Tech Considered
5:26 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

That's Just Like 'Her': Could We Ever Love A Computer?

Joaquin Phoenix stars in the film Her, in which his character falls in love with an operating system. When will artificial intelligence programs like Siri evolve to the point where we'll fall in love with them?
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:36 pm

The film Her, about a man who falls in love with his computerized personal assistant, has been nominated for five Oscars including best picture. It takes place at an unspecified time in the future when computer voices sound like Scarlett Johansson instead of Siri. This made me wonder if it was really possible to fall in love with an artificially intelligent being.

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Shots - Health News
12:49 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

'Lung In A Box' Keeps Organs Breathing Before Transplants

The Organ Care System keeps lungs warm, breathing and nourished while outside the body.
MediCommConsultants

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 8:57 am

When doctors rush a lung to a hospital for a transplant, the precious cargo arrives in the operating room in a container that seems more appropriate for Bud Light — a cooler filled with ice.

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All Tech Considered
12:34 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

I Might Be Your 'Secret Name': A Facebook Mystery

A few years ago I started getting mysterious notifications from hundreds of strangers on Facebook — dozens came in every day from all over the world. Figuring out what was going on took me back to my first day on Facebook, six days after it launched in February 2004.
Joerg Koch AP

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 1:27 pm

Ten years ago today, on Feb. 10, 2004, I became the 1,990th person to join what was then called "thefacebook." This is not special. I wasn't an early adopter — like those first 25 Harvard users who get profiled every time Facebook hits a big milestone — and I wasn't friends with Mark Zuckerberg or anyone who mattered in this epic saga of dorm room innovation/world domination that we've all heard one too many times.

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