Technology & Digital Life

All Tech Considered
7:18 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

What Burritos And Sandwiches Can Teach Us About Innovation

When there's no bun involved, is it a sandwich? The KFC Double Down is bacon and cheese sandwiched between two pieces of chicken.
Sandra Mu Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 10:08 am

When you slap some meat inside two slices of bread, you have a sandwich, at least according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which enforces the safety and labeling of meat and poultry.

"We're talking about a traditional closed-face sandwich," says Mark Wheeler, who works in food safety at the USDA. "A sandwich is a meat or poultry filling between two slices of bread, a bun or a biscuit."

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All Tech Considered
4:54 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

A User-Friendly Gardening System For The Plant-Challenged

SproutsIO Inc. allows people to easily grow fresh produce inside a home or office. The system is a spinoff of research done at the MIT Media Lab.
SproutsIO Inc.

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 10:07 am

Don't have a green thumb but seeking the therapeutic nature of gardening? Want the convenience and satisfaction of growing your own produce at home? Not to worry: All you need is an electrical outlet, a flat surface and some water.

Meet SproutsIO Inc., a "plug-and-play" user-friendly microfarming appliance for people to easily grow fresh fruits and veggies inside their home or office.

Here's how it works:

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All Tech Considered
4:22 am
Wed July 9, 2014

In Google Newsroom, Brazil Defeat Is Not A Headline

After the Brazil-Germany semifinal, Google's experimental newsroom focused on search trends that don't rub salt in Brazil's wounds.
Google

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 10:41 am

If you do a Google search on the World Cup game in which Germany slaughtered Brazil 7-1, the top results will say things like "destroy," "defeat," and "humiliate."

But Google itself is choosing to steer clear of negative terms. The company has created an experimental newsroom in San Francisco to monitor the World Cup, and turn popular search results into viral content. And they've got a clear editorial bias.

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All Tech Considered
4:30 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

The Hazards Of Probing The Internet's Dark Side

Journalist Brian Krebs spends time in the dark areas of the Internet, where hackers steal data off credit cards and sell the information in online underground stores. Krebs has learned computer code and how to get onto black market websites and cybercrime networks.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 5:00 pm

Late last year, hackers breached Target's data security and stole information from millions of credit cards. Brian Krebs, who writes about cybercrime and computer security for his blog, Krebs on Security, broke the story. A few days later, he broke the story of a credit card breach at Neiman Marcus.

Krebs spends time in the dark areas of the Internet, where hackers steal data off credit cards and sell the information in online underground stores.

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Trade Lingo
4:13 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Grokking And Greebling In The 'Strange Land' Of Gamer Lingo

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 6:13 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Imagine hearing this phrase at work - Sam has grokked the jumping. That's commonplace for Max Nichols. He's a videogame designer from Needham, Massachusetts, and he joins us to explain for our summer-long series on trade lingo. We've asked for jargon from your line of work that would stump people on the outside, and Max submitted grok, or grokked. Why don't you translate for us?

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Shots - Health News
3:45 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Will This Tech Tool Help Manage Older People's Health? Ask Dad

Lively is a sensor that can be attached to a pill box, keys or doors. It lets people know whether aging parents are taking their medicines or sticking to their routines.
Courtesy of Lively

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:39 am

Aging 2.0 may not sound like the hippest start-up in San Francisco, but it's part of an industry worth $2 billion and growing fast — technology to help older adults.

Katy Fike, 35, is the company's co-founder. She's devoted to making sure that older adults who are supposed to use the products are involved in their development.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

Police Use Dog To Find Memory And Hard Drives In Search

In June, the 167th Patrol Dog Class graduated from their canine narcotics and electronic media detection training, held by the Connecticut State Police Canine Unit. At far left is Thoreau, who now helps police in Rhode Island find computer hard drives.
Daniel Owen Courtesy of The Hartford Courant

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 2:18 pm

Police in Rhode Island have a secret weapon to fight child pornography: a 2-year-old Labrador named Thoreau, who's been trained to sniff out computer hard drives. The dog is credited with finding a thumb drive that was hidden deep inside a metal cabinet last month.

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NPR Ed
10:38 am
Tue July 8, 2014

How A Text Message Could Revolutionize Student Aid

Could students soon text their way to financial aid?
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 1:53 pm

Every year, more than a million students don't complete the FAFSA — the main federal student-loan application.

One big reason? The form is so complicated that it discourages some people from even trying.

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All Tech Considered
4:53 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

We Asked, You Answered: Going To Extremes To Disconnect On Vacation

Our readers wrote in on how they tried to take a vacation from their smartphones.
Christian Wheatley iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 10:08 am

Summer is a great time to take a break from some of the stressors in our lives. For many of us, that stress is brought on by too much screen time and the pressure to stay connected.

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All Tech Considered
4:07 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

From Pen And Paper To 3-D, Look Who's Challenging Google Maps

A 3-D map of London by Nokia's mapping division, called Here.
Here

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 9:47 am

When it comes to creating a digital map of the world, you may think of Google workers driving around in high-tech cars mounted with cameras — snapping photos of everything.

But Robert Scott walks the streets of London jotting down address numbers with nothing more than a pen and a piece of paper.

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