Technology & Digital Life

NPR Story
12:01 pm
Fri January 11, 2013

How E-Waste Is Becoming a Big, Global Problem

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 1:03 pm

According to the EPA, more than 2.5 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, is produced each year in the U.S. Derek Markham, a contributing writer for Treehugger.com, discusses the global impacts, and why you should think twice before discarding your old cell phone.

Technology
5:55 am
Fri January 11, 2013

CES Vendors Want To Hook Up Your Home

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 8:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

That big consumer electronics show in Las Vegas ends today. And while big tech firms like Google and Apple did not attend, an increasingly diverse range of companies took their place. With more and more devices connecting to the Internet, many companies are flocking to this festival of gadgets, hoping to bring all the appliances in your home online. NPR's Steve Henn reports.

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Planet Money
3:46 am
Fri January 11, 2013

Black Market Pharmacies And The Big Business Of Spam

Acne medicine, in Turkish.
Dave Keck

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 8:35 am

An apparent feud between two black market pharmacies has shed light on a shady global industry.

"Rx-Promotion and SpamIt probably are responsible for upward of 50 or 60 percent of spam that you and I got in our inboxes over the last five years," said Brian Krebs, a cyber-security reporter who chronicled the alleged feud on his website. "It's just a ridiculous amount of problems that these two guys cause for everybody."

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Digital Life
5:00 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

'M-Commerce' On The Rise As More Consumers Use Mobile Devices To Shop

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 6:26 pm

A new report says that people buying stuff with their mobile devices — known as "m-commerce" — is way up this year over last year.

Business
5:39 am
Thu January 10, 2013

Latest TV Technoloy: Ultra-High Definition TV.

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 3:04 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Television makers are trying to find the next big thing that will get you to throw out your current TV and buy a new one. They thought it might be 3D TV. That didn't work out. So now they've come up with something new. They're showing it off this week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, which is where we found Rich Jaroslovsky. He writes about technology for Bloomberg News, and he told us about the newest new viewing experience.

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Digital Life
3:28 am
Thu January 10, 2013

In Video-Streaming Rat Race, Fast Is Never Fast Enough

Tommy Ingberg iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 1:55 pm

On average, YouTube streams 4 billion hours of video per month. That's a lot of video, but it's only a fraction of the larger online-streaming ecosystem. For video-streaming services, making sure clips always load properly is extremely challenging, and a new study reveals that it's important to video providers, too.

Maybe this has happened to you: You're showing a friend some hilarious video that you found online. And right before you get to the punch line, a little loading dial pops up in the middle of the screen.

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Digital Life
5:22 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

3-D Sensors Could Change Shopping Experience In Real-Time

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:31 pm

The Consumer Electronics Show started Tuesday in Las Vegas. There's a lot of excitement about widespread use of 3-D sensor technology in smartphones and tablets.

Asia
5:21 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

Critics Say 'Google Delegation' Lends Legitimacy To North Korean Regime

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 6:31 pm

Melissa Block talks to Jean Lee, Korea Bureau Chief of the Associated Press, about the private delegation that is visiting North Korea. The group is led by former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and includes Google's executive chairman Eric Schmidt.

The Two-Way
3:59 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

Attacks On U.S. Banks' Websites Seen As Work Of Iran

Sophisticated hacking attacks on U.S. banks in recent months have distinctive qualities that are leading investigators to believe another nation may be behind the assault. The likely suspect is Iran, which officials believe may be trying to even the score for American hacking of its nuclear program.

At least nine U.S. financial institutions have been hit since September; more attacks are expected. And part of what makes them suspicious is that they seem calculated not to steal account data or money, but instead to disrupt the banking system.

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The Salt
3:12 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

How Google Earth Revealed Chicago's Hidden Farms

Uncommon Ground, a certified green restaurant in Chicago, hosts an organic farm on its rooftop.
Zoran Orlic of Zero Studio Photography Uncommon Ground

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 2:14 pm

Cities have plenty of reasons to care about how much food is being produced within their limits — especially now that community and guerrilla gardeners are taking over vacant urban lots across the country. But most cities can only guess at where exactly crops are growing.

And in Chicago, researchers have found that looks — from ground level, anyway — can be very deceiving when it comes to food production.

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