Technology & Digital Life

Parallels
3:37 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

Thanks, But No: Social Media Refuses To Share With Turkey

An anti-government protester wearing a gas mask uses a cellphone to read the news on social media as demonstrators gather at midnight in Istanbul's Taksim Gezi Park on June 13.
Ozan Kose AFP/Getty Images

Turkey's battle with the Internet took a new twist on Wednesday.

A Turkish government minister said Twitter has refused to cooperate with the government, but that Facebook had responded "positively" and was "in cooperation with the state."

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Middle East
5:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Jordan Accused Of Targeting Online Dissent

A Jordanian woman surfs the Web at an office in the Amman, Jordan, on Sept. 30, 2009. The country's government is under fire from media activists for blocking hundreds of websites across the kingdom.
Ali Jareki Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 2:43 pm

Jordan's King Abdullah vowed to make the desert kingdom a "free Internet" country as he began his rule more than a decade ago. On June 2, when local Internet providers were ordered to block hundreds of news websites across the kingdom, Web publishers protested the broken promise and international media watchdog organizations charged censorship.

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U.S.
4:51 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Some Tech Companies Find Ways Not To Hire Americans

Tech workers looking for jobs may think twice before looking at job ads that are targeted at Americans but actually are intended for foreigners.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 11:31 am

Lawmakers continue to wrangle over a bill that would overhaul the nation's immigration system. One provision in this bill would allow companies to import a lot more skilled workers. The tech industry has lobbied hard for this, despite fears among some American workers about the extra competition.

Illinois Senator Dick Durbin says the bill has American workers covered. "Employers will be given a chance to hire a temporary foreign worker when truly needed. But first, they'll be required to recruit Americans. No exceptions, no excuses," he said.

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The Two-Way
7:10 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Google Reader Replacement Race: Feedly And Digg Reader Make Waves

An image shows the new Digg Reader, built as an option to replace Google Reader. The RSS subscription service will be discontinued on July 1, Google says.
Digg

With just days remaining before Google pulls the plug on its Reader RSS feed service, reality is sinking in. And the market for free or low-cost replacements is growing, as Digg has rolled out its new reader in the past week. Other companies report a burst of new customers after Google's announcement that it would discontinue its RSS system on July 1.

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All Tech Considered
9:58 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Closing The Tech Industry's Gender Gap Requires Better Data

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A long line for a men's room at a 2009 tech conference in Omaha, Neb. Photos of this situation have now inspired a Twitter feed.
SleepyJeanne Flickr

Editor's Note: As part of our reboot of All Tech Considered, we'll invite contributors to blog about big-picture questions facing tech and society.

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All Tech Considered
4:09 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

For Modern Jurors, Being On A Case Means Being Offline

More courts are asking jurors to avoid social media services and tools that have become an integral part of modern life, like Twitter, Facebook, email, texting, instant messaging and Internet research.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 6:10 pm

In the Mercer County Courthouse in Trenton, N.J., John Saunders, a jury manager, spends his weekdays shepherding potential jurors. Much of what he tells them regards the paraphernalia of 21st century life: cellphones, tablets and laptops. These are OK to use in the waiting room, he tells them. "We realize life does not stop."

But in the courtroom, it's all phones off. Laptops and iPads stay with Saunders, and jurors are given a tag to reclaim their items. "Unlike the airport, when you return, your item will be there, and no baggage charge guaranteed," he says.

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All Tech Considered
11:10 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Rebooting The All Tech Blog, With Your Help

This blog may contain cats.
Flickr

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 12:36 pm

Perhaps it's fitting, in this time of information overload in the vaunted information age, that there's too much news about tech and it's wearing us down. The world needs another tech blog like it needs another Kardashian spinoff show. But in the flood of headlines about fresh funding for startups or Xbox versus Sony, we do think there's room for context and explanation.

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Politics
5:16 am
Mon June 24, 2013

Political Conservatives Stage App-Building Competition

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's no great secret that Republicans are behind in applying digital technology to politics. They admitted as much after the last presidential election. And in an effort to catch up, over the weekend, political conservatives staged an event called the Liberty Hackathon in San Francisco. The sponsor of the app building competition was the Charles Koch Institute, named for its benefactor the billionaire backer of the Tea Party Movement.

NPR's Nathan Rott went to the event and sent us this report.

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Business
4:52 am
Mon June 24, 2013

DuckDuckGo Benefits From Internet Searchers Wanting Privacy

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The leaks this month by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden revealed just how widespread government surveillance of phone and online information actually is. The revelations of the government's PRISM program have been raising the concerns about privacy, but also have boom to companies that promise greater privacy online.

Emma Jacobs of member station WHYY in Philadelphia has this report.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Snowden Extradition Could Get Snarled In Hong Kong Courts

A banner shows support for Edward Snowden, in Hong Kong on Monday.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 8:52 pm

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

National Security Advisor Tom Donilon tells CBS News that Washington has asked Hong Kong to turn over NSA leaker Edward Snowden under the terms of a 1998 extradition treaty between the two governments.

"Hong Kong has been a historically good partner of the United States in law enforcement matters and we expect them to comply with the treaty in this case," Donilon said.

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