Summer Reading Camp

Nick de la Canal/WFAE

Third graders in North Carolina who aren’t reading at grade level started summer reading camps this week. It’s part of the new third grade reading law. Last year state officials predicted 60 percent of all third-graders would have to enroll in the camps, but in reality, that number is much lower.

Lisa Miller

Third graders in North Carolina are on a deadline. They have just a few weeks to prove to the state their reading is up to snuff. Otherwise, they’ll be headed to summer reading camps. There’s a lot to do: lessons to learn, passages to read, and tests to take. It’s all part of the new third-grade reading law. 

albertogp123 / Flickr

North Carolina students will find it easier this year to pass the state’s standardized tests.  The state board of education decided yesterday to lower the score it would take to be deemed proficient. That means thousands of third-graders will no longer have to attend summer reading camps mandated by the new reading law.

WFAE’s Lisa Miller joins Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt in the studio. 

KK: Lisa, why did the state board decide to do this now?

North Carolina school districts can now use reading tests of their own choosing to decide whether a third-grader must go to a summer reading camp or can go on to fourth grade. The State Board of Education approved the districts’ request today. 

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools expects to have 5,000 third-graders qualify for reading camps this summer as a result of the state's new third grade reading requirement. District officials worry state money won't come close to covering the cost of these camps.  They’re asking the state for flexibility on the camps, as well as all the tests that come with the new third grade reading law.