Southeast Asian Coalition

Michael Tomsic

The number of immigrants becoming American citizens is on the rise. In Charlotte and across the country, applications for citizenship have spiked as the election approaches, according to federal data. That’s not unusual in presidential election years. But in North Carolina, the increases are in fact the continuation of a trend that started five years ago. WFAE’s Michael Tomsic explores what’s driving more immigrants to become Americans.

Michael Tomsic

"A good first step." That's how some North Carolina immigration advocates and business leaders are describing the immigration overhaul filed in the U.S. Senate Wednesday.


Michael Tomsic

 Immigration advocates in Charlotte are waiting anxiously for a group of U.S. senators known as the "Gang of Eight" to unveil their plan for immigration reform.

That plan may create a path to citizenship for immigrants in the country illegally. But advocates are concerned that immigrants may also lose something as part of a deal – a chance to reunite with their families.


Michael Tomsic

About 100 immigrants in Charlotte took a big step toward becoming U.S. citizens Sunday. They’re all legal residents. And as part of a national campaign, three local groups teamed up at UNC Charlotte to help them apply for citizenship.

The main thing that’s kept Hing Fu and his family from trying to become U.S. citizens is the cost.

"We are below the poverty line at the moment," Fu said.

He's a senior at UNC Charlotte. He and his mom emigrated from Hong Kong more than a decade ago, and his stepdad is from Mexico.