Duke Energy

Duke Energy says state regulators have approved construction of two new solar farms - a 60-megawatt project in Union County, and a 15.4-megawatt facility in Davie County.  Duke says both will be generating electricity by year's end.

Duke Energy plans to add two more solar energy projects to its North Carolina power network next year, as it works to meet state requirements for clean electricity.

The company is asking the North Carolina Utilities Commission for permission to take over two projects already in development -  a 60-megawatt solar farm in Monroe and a 15.4-megawatt facility in Mocksville, in Davie County.

If approved, construction on both would start in March and be done by the end of 2016. 

Duke Energy Solar farm near Elizabeth City NC
Duke Energy

Corning Inc. is boosting its use of renewable energy in North Carolina through a big solar power deal announced Monday with a division of Charlotte-based Duke Energy.

Duke Energy Renewables began construction earlier this year on an 80-megawatt solar farm in Conetoe, east of Rocky Mount in eastern North Carolina. When it’s finished later this month, it will be the largest of its kind east of the Mississippi.

Duke Energy Solar farm near Elizabeth City NC
Duke Energy

Duke Energy and Google announced a deal Tuesday that will supply Google's Lenoir data center with power from a new solar farm under development in Rutherford County. Duke says the 61-megawatt facility being developed by Rutherford Solar LLC will be one of North Carolina's largest.

Under the deal, Duke Energy will buy power from the new solar project, and re-sell it to Google. The partnership is the first through Duke's Green Source Rider program, which supplies renewable energy to non-residential customers. The project's cost won't be passed on to the utility's other customers.

Mike Linksvayer / Flickr

Those in North Carolina’s solar industry will have their fingers crossed as the North Carolina House and Senate approach a compromise on next year’s budget. The state’s solar tax credit is set to expire at the end of the year. The industry claims without an extension—and with other changes lawmakers are considering—North Carolina solar will stall.

Elliot Brown / Flickr

North Carolina put more solar power online last year than any state other than California. But companies or homeowners wanting to put solar panels on their roofs face major restrictions. State lawmakers have introduced a bill to change that. It’s drawing opposition from Duke Energy, but also dividing solar advocates.

Strata Solar

North Carolina energy regulators quietly released one of their most significant, long-awaited decisions of 2014, just as the year was ending. The state Utilities Commission had spent nearly the entire year re-evaluating the rules for solar energy. On Wednesday, the commission decided to leave substantially intact the rules which have underlied a solar energy boom in North Carolina.

Magnum Energy

The nation’s largest wind farm in Wyoming would connect to  one of the largest energy storage facilities in Utah to power Los Angeles, in a proposal announced Tuesday by four companies, including Duke Energy. The project’s scale is more akin to a nuclear plant.


Davidson College’s long-rumored solar farm drew another step closer this week, when Cornelius-based solar firm O2 Energies filed an application with state regulators for a $10 million solar panel array off Grey Road.

The solar industry has been booming in North Carolina, but that boom could be coming to an end, as Ben Bradford reported this week. Ben Bradford provides analysis of what's going on.

Greg, Lisa and Ben also discuss the Houston school system's recruitment of North Carolina teachers, and the legislative debate over capping county sales taxes. Plus, the MeghaMeter returns.