Science & Environment

The Two-Way
4:20 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Get Ready For The Third Installment In The Lunar Eclipse Tetrad

The moon exhibits a deep orange glow as the Earth casts its shadow in a total lunar eclipse as seen in Manila, Philippines, before dawn Thursday in a June 2011 eclipse.
Bullit Marquez AP

North Americans could get a glimpse of the Earth shadowing the moon (very) early Saturday — the third in a series of four lunar eclipses that began nearly a year ago. But only those on the West Coast, in the Pacific or Asia will have a chance at seeing the full show.

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Shots - Health News
2:52 pm
Fri April 3, 2015

Men And Women Use Different Scales To Weigh Moral Dilemmas

Todd Davidson Getty Images/Illustration Works

You find a time machine and travel to 1920. A young Austrian artist and war veteran named Adolf Hitler is staying in the hotel room next to yours. The doors aren't locked, so you could easily stroll next door and smother him. World War II would never happen.

But Hitler hasn't done anything wrong yet. Is it acceptable to kill him to prevent World War II?

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Environment
6:09 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

California Water Experts Explore How To 'Live With' Long-Term Drought

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 6:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
5:10 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

Drug-Resistant Food Poisoning Lands In The U.S.

Shigella is a huge problem around the world. The bacteria infect about 100 million people each year and kill about 600,000.
CDC/Science Source

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 12:36 pm

This time last year, a painful new virus was knocking on our doorstep. Travelers were bringing chikungunya to the U.S. And eventually, the mosquito-borne virus set up shop in Florida.

Now the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says another nasty pathogen is hitching a ride to the U.S. with travelers: multidrug-resistant Shigella.

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Shots - Health News
9:52 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Searching Online May Make You Think You're Smarter Than You Are

Stuart Kinlough Getty Images/Ikon Images

Originally published on Fri April 3, 2015 5:13 pm

Using the Internet is an easy way to feel omniscient. Enter a search term and the answers appear before your eyes.

But at any moment you're also just a few taps away from becoming an insufferable know-it-all. Searching for answers online gives people an inflated sense of their own knowledge, according to a study. It makes people think they know more than they actually do.

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Health
4:39 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

Germanwings Crash Highlights Workplace Approaches To Mental Health

When it comes to an employee's mental health status, what does an employer need to know, or have a right to know?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 2, 2015 2:12 pm

The horrifying crash last week of the Germanwings flight operated by Lufthansa has put a spotlight on what the airline knew — and what it should, or could have done — about its pilot's mental health.

Lufthansa could face unlimited liability, after the pilot allegedly brought the plane down deliberately. Here in the U.S., employment experts say monitoring employees' mental health status raises a thicket of complicated issues.

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Environment
4:39 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

California Governor Announces First Ever Mandatory Water Restrictions

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 8:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
3:41 pm
Wed April 1, 2015

A Virus In Your Mouth Helps Fight The Flu

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 6:07 pm

Hidden inside all of us are likely thousands of viruses — maybe more. They just hang out, harmlessly. We don't even know they're there.

But every once in a while, one of these viral inhabitants might help us out.

Young people infected with a type of herpes virus have a better immune response to the flu vaccine than those not infected, scientists at Stanford University report Wednesday. In mice, the virus directly stops influenza itself.

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The Salt
10:28 am
Wed April 1, 2015

Scary Times For California Farmers As Snowpack Hits Record Lows

Dry, cracked earth is visible on a cantaloupe farm near Firebaugh, Calif., last August. Record-low snowpack levels in the Sierra Nevada mean most Central California farmers will face another year without water from the federal Central Valley Project.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 6:23 pm

The water outlook in drought-racked California just got a lot worse: Snowpack levels across the entire Sierra Nevada are now the lowest in recorded history — just 6 percent of the long-term average. That shatters the previous low record on this date of 25 percent, set in 1977 and again last year.

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