Science & Environment

Children's Health
5:22 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Nice Kids Finish First: Study Finds Social Skills Can Predict Future Success

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 7:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
12:11 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Webcast: Sports And Health In America

Pamela Moore/iStockphoto/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 3:05 pm

The vast majority of kids in America play sports.

But while about three-quarters of adults played sports when they were younger, only 1 in 4 still plays sports today. Among them, men are more than twice as likely as women to play.

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Shots - Health News
12:04 pm
Thu July 16, 2015

Screaming For Science: The Secrets Of Crying Babies And Car Alarms

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 5:08 pm

It's almost impossible to ignore a screaming baby. (Click here if you doubt that.) And now scientists think they know why.

"Screams occupy their own little patch of the soundscape that doesn't seem to be used for other things," says David Poeppel, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at New York University and director of the Department of Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute in Frankfurt.

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The Two-Way
5:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover.
Michael Scates AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 11:03 am

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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Shots - Health News
5:02 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Why We Play Sports: Winning Motivates, But Can Backfire, Too

Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 5:08 pm

Playing sports has always been important to 31-year-old Erik Johanson, a city planner in Philadelphia. Johanson thrived in baseball and ice hockey as a kid, he says — "one of the best players on the team in high school."

Today, Johanson is married and expecting his first child but is still passionate about ice hockey — and about winning. He plays on a highly competitive team of guys who got together after college and still play weekly in an adult league; they hope to take the crown this year.

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U.S.
5:01 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Wildfire Worries Rage In Typically 'Wet' Washington State

A wildfire raced through the neighborhood of Broadview in Wenatchee, Wash., destroying numerous homes and apple-processing facilities. Fire managers are worried that parts of Washington state are years behind other places in the West when it comes to fire mitigation and prevention.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 8:01 pm

The iconic forests of the Pacific Northwest — with their towering, moss-covered fir and pine trees — have never been this dry. The grass underneath the ferns has already turned gold.

Of the five large wildfires burning in Washington alone right now, one has scorched more than 1,500 acres of a rainforest on the typically misty Olympic Peninsula.

The wildfire threat in the drought-stricken Pacific Northwest right now is extraordinary, and there are concerns that the region may not be prepared for a long summer.

A Wake-Up Call

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The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Strange Worlds At The Edge Of Our Solar System Finally Come Into Focus

New details of Pluto's largest moon, Charon, are revealed in this image from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager.
NASA

Scientists have unveiled the best photos of Pluto and its moons that humanity is likely to see for at least a generation. These images were taken Tuesday by NASA's New Horizons space probe as it hurtled past Pluto at more than 30,000 miles per hour.

Since its discovery in 1930, Pluto has revealed itself to be an oddball world. It's smaller than our own moon, and it orbits at an angle relative to the plane of the solar system. Because of its size and distance, even the Hubble Space Telescope could only make it out as a brown smudge, billions of miles away.

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Shots - Health News
1:31 pm
Wed July 15, 2015

Even Mild Mental Health Problems In Children Can Cause Trouble Later

It's not easy for a child who has had mental health issues to make a successful transition into adulthood. But even children who have symptoms that are mild enough that they wouldn't be diagnosed are more likely to struggle with life as adults, a study finds.

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All Tech Considered
10:46 am
Wed July 15, 2015

3 Emerging Themes From #RaceOnTech

Mary McLain NPR

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 9:45 am

We know that women and minorities continue to be underrepresented in the STEM fields — that's science, technology, engineering and math. Now dip into #RaceOnTech to find out why. Since Monday, entrepreneurs, scientists, computer scientists and coders from Silicon Valley to Greenbelt, Md., have been sharing their thoughts one tweet at a time.

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Shots - Health News
10:19 am
Wed July 15, 2015

States Make Laws To Protect Patients From Hidden Medical Bills

It's a situation that occurs all too often: Someone goes to the emergency room and doesn't learn until he gets a hefty bill that one of the doctors who treated him wasn't in his insurance network. Or a diligent consumer checks before scheduling surgery to make sure that the hospital she plans to use and the doctors who will perform the operation are all in her network. Then she learns later that an assistant surgeon she didn't know — and who wasn't in her network — scrubbed in on her operation, and charged her for it.

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