Science & Environment

Around the Nation
11:24 am
Mon January 7, 2013

'Black Gold Boom' Brings New Life To North Dakota

Men hard at work in oil-booming North Dakota.
Todd Melby

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 1:58 pm

Jobs may be scarce around the United States, but not in western North Dakota. A massive oil boom in Williston and the surrounding area is transforming the landscape and culture of this once-tranquil region.

Producer Todd Melby, who has been covering the boom for public media, composed an interactive documentary with radio stories and videos called "Rough Ride: The Oil Patch Tour." This guided tour through the oil patches illustrates the growth of oil fields over time.

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Business
5:55 pm
Sun January 6, 2013

iPads, China: Twin Threats To Wisconsin's Paper Industry

The Nekoosa Paper Mill was established in 1883. Its mill in Nekoosa, Wis., sits on the banks of the Wisconsin River, and is now owned by a Canadian paper company.
Mike De Sisti Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 8:11 pm

Deep in the Northwoods of Wisconsin, lumberjacks still cry "timber," just not as often as they once did. Across the state, milling lumber into good paper, the kind called "knowledge" grade for books, has employed thousands for more than a century, and created a distinct culture.

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The Two-Way
5:12 am
Sat January 5, 2013

Big Quake Off Southern Alaska Coast Causes Tsunami

Originally published on Sat January 5, 2013 2:12 pm

An earthquake with a magnitude of 7.5 hit off the coast of southeastern Alaska just before midnight local time Friday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The USGS initially reported the event as a magnitude 7.7 quake.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says sea level readings indicate the quake caused a tsunami. "It may have been destructive along coasts near the earthquake epicenter," a NOAA report said.

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The Salt
2:52 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Dumpster Diver TV: Austrians Cook Up Food Waste Reality Show

The Austrians behind Waste Cooking want to show the culinary possibilities of food that ends up in the trash.
Courtesy Wastecooking.com

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 9:43 am

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NPR Story
1:21 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

Negative Temperatures That Are Hotter Than The Sun

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 1:33 pm

Scientists have cooled potassium gas to one billionth of a degree below absolute zero. But in the quantum world, that's actually hotter than the Sun. It's hotter, even, than infinity degrees Kelvin. Vladan Vuletić, a quantum physicist at MIT, talks about this 'Bizarro World' temperature.

Shots - Health News
1:18 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

As Norovirus Rages, A Robot Named 'Vomiting Larry' Gets His Closeup

Vomiting Larry doing what he does best.
U.K. Health and Safety Laboratory

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 11:06 am

The lab robot affectionately called "Vomiting Larry" has gone viral. His image and videoed vomiting for science are all over the Web.

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The Picture Show
12:05 pm
Fri January 4, 2013

'Why We Are Here': Capturing The Spirit Of Mobile, Ala.

Roy Hyde, Fairhope.
Courtesy of Alex Harris

In 1991, photographer Alex Harris was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in general nonfiction for his book River of Traps, written with William deBuys. It told the story, in words and pictures, of an old-time New Mexican villager. Harris didn't win.

Instead, the prize went to evolutionary biologist E.O. Wilson for The Ants.

"It took me 20 years to get over that defeat," said Harris.

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NPR Story
10:50 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Looking Back On A Year In Science

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 1:33 pm

In 2012 the Higgs boson was spotted at CERN, private company SpaceX began supply flights to the International Space Station, and the world bade farewell to the Galapagos tortoise Lonesome George. A panel of journalists discusses the year's top stories in science.

NPR Story
10:50 am
Fri January 4, 2013

A Journey To The Oort Cloud, Where Comets Are Born

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 1:33 pm

The comet ISON, discovered by two amateur astronomers last year, will zoom past the Earth next fall. But where did it come from? Astronomer Andrew Fraknoi says a passing star could have flung the comet our way from the Oort Cloud, a distant realm of ice chunks at the outer limits of the solar system.

NPR Story
10:46 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Science Looked Good In 2012

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 12:23 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

And now joining us is Flora Lichtman. Hi, Flora.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Ira.

FLATOW: Multimedia editor with our Video Pick of the Week, and it's topical, of course.

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