Science & Environment

The Salt
6:32 am
Sun October 21, 2012

Despite Protest, College Plans To Slaughter, Serve Farm's Beloved Oxen

After a leg injury didn't heal well earlier this year, Lou has difficulty walking. He and his partner, Bill, will be slaughtered at the end of the month, and their meat will be used to feed students at Green Mountain College in Vermont.
Nina Keck Vermont Public Radio

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

If the thought of eating horse meat makes you queasy, what about strong, sturdy oxen? A small Vermont college that emphasizes sustainable living will soon slaughter two beloved campus residents: Bill and Lou, a pair of oxen. Green Mountain College plans to serve the meat from the oxen in its dining hall, but the plan has drawn international outcry and a massive Facebook petition to save the oxen.

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The Salt
1:53 pm
Sat October 20, 2012

This Candy Is From Heaven (But Don't Eat It)

Mark Mauthner Heritage Auctions

Originally published on Sat October 20, 2012 2:15 pm

Pop quiz: What is this thing?

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Science
1:24 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

How One Guy Raised $1.3 Million for a Tesla Museum

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

Matthew Inman, creator of the humor site "The Oatmeal," led an online drive that raised over $1 million for a new museum to honor the inventor Nikola Tesla. Inman discusses how to build a successful crowdfunding campaign, and why Tesla is the greatest geek who ever lived.

Research News
1:20 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Learning From the Things That Annoy Us

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

A professor spends his off-time tracking the little things in life that bother us. Marc Abrahams, editor of the Annals of Improbable Research, tells us what poor parking, long waits in the doctor's office, and the controversial brussel sprout tell us about science.

Health
1:03 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

When Infections "Spillover"

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

In his new book Spillover writer David Quammen traces the evolution of Ebola, HIV and other diseases that moved from animals to humans. Quammen describes how scientists look for the reservoirs of the infectious agents, and what might be done to prevent the next pandemic.

Energy
1:03 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

New Program Spurs Solar Development on Public Land

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

The government recently announced a new plan to facilitate the development of solar energy projects on public land in six Western states. Lawrence Susskind, a professor of urban and environmental planning at MIT, explains what it means for the future of renewable energy.

NPR Story
12:12 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Scientists In The Dark Over Birth Of The Moon

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow today. The moon, it's our nearest neighbor, but we don't know much about where our companion came from. In the 1800s, Charles Darwin's son, Sir George Darwin, proposed that maybe the moon just popped off from the Earth when the Earth was spinning much faster than it is today.

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NPR Story
12:12 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Spacecraft Records 'Chorus' of Space Sounds

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

A NASA spacecraft captured the clearest recording yet of what space sounds like inside Earth's radiation belts. Craig Kletzing, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Iowa, explains what causes these eerie chirping noises, and what we can learn from them.

NPR Story
12:12 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Winter Weather Predictions

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

Science Or Folklore? — The Old Farmer's Almanac predicts winter weather months in advance. Is that even scientifically possible? Meteorologist Jason Samenow, of The Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang, talks about the science and art of seasonal forecasting, and why even the pros at NOAA sometimes get it wrong.

NPR Story
12:12 pm
Fri October 19, 2012

Making Sense Of Presidential Polls

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 4:55 pm

In less than a month, the 2012 presidential election turned from an almost certain victory for President Obama to a neck-and-neck race. New York Times blogger and statistician Nate Silver and Princeton neuroscientist Sam Wang talk about making sense of the polls--and why not all votes are created equal.

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