Science & Environment

Environment
5:01 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Climate Change Could Bump Up Instances Of Turbulence

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Bring on the air sickness bags and light up the fasten seatbelt sign. A new study finds that flights are going to become more turbulent due to climate change. Paul Williams led the study. It's been published in the journal Nature Climate Change and he joins me now from Vienna. Welcome to the program.

PAUL WILLIAMS: Hi, Melissa, it's a pleasure to be here.

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Environment
5:01 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Nominee To Lead EPA Grilled Over Past Work At Agency

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 5:49 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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The Salt
4:13 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

A Legal Twist In The Effort To Ban Cameras From Livestock Plants

Cows wait to be milked at a California dairy farm.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 4:38 pm

For years, undercover videos documenting animal cruelty at farms and slaughterhouses have cast the nation's meat and dairy farmers in a grim light.

In response, the livestock industry supported legislative efforts in multiple states designed to keep cameras from recording without permission in livestock plants. The Salt reported on these efforts, which activists call "ag gag" bills, last year.

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Space
4:12 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Origin Of 'Mercury' Meteorite Still Puzzles Scientists

Several fragments of this unusual rock were discovered last year in Morocco. It's been hailed as the first meteorite from the planet Mercury, but where it came from in the solar system isn't certain.
Stefan Ralew

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 8:18 am

A strange green rock discovered in Morocco last year was hailed by the press as the first meteorite from Mercury. But scientists who've been puzzling over the stone ever since say the accumulating evidence may point in a different direction. Maybe, just maybe, they say, the 4.56-billion-year-old rock fell to Earth from the asteroid belt located between Mars and Jupiter.

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Shots - Health News
2:37 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

On Call In The Wild: Animals Play Doctor, Too

Is there a doctor in the house? Chimpanzees eat certain plants to rid themselves of parasites.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:01 am

What do animals do when they get sick? They can't go to the doctor's office. They can't go to the pharmacy. Heck, they can't even go online.

Nevertheless, a surprising number of wild creatures have figured out ways to use herbs, resins, and even alcohol and nicotine for health's sake.

Scientists review the ranks of animal pharmacists in the latest issue of Science.

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Shots - Health News
1:38 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Leading Man's Chin: Universally Hot Or Not?

Two prominent chins meet: Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman kiss in the 1946 thriller Notorious.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:02 am

Cary Grant's chin may appeal to you and Ingrid Bergman. But that might not be the case among the indigenous people of Australia.

And the idea that a guy's jutting jawline might not cause women the world over to swoon calls into question the notion that some characteristics are pretty much automatic signals of desirability for prospective mates, researchers say.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:25 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Is This Science Journalism? Nah. Then What Is It?

Rethink Canada

Journalism may not be the right word for this. It's a kind of reporting. What you see here is true, and carefully edited.

It's not art, though the images are sharp and concentrated.

It's more than advertising, (though that's its purpose) because it is telling you something abstract and true about the world, like a lesson.

It's not education. It's too sassy, too clever. Too beautiful.

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Shots - Health News
7:17 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

How Much Does It Hurt? Let's Scan Your Brain

A technique for imaging the brain allowed researchers to distinguish between physical and emotional pain.
Courtesy of Tom Wager

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 3:16 pm

Scientists reported Wednesday that they had developed a way to measure how much pain people are experiencing by scanning their brains.

The researchers hope the technique will help doctors treat pain better, but the work is also raising concerns about whether the technique might interfere with doctors simply listening to their patients.

Now, when someone is in pain, a doctor has no way to judge its severity except to ask questions, a method that often is inadequate.

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The Salt
5:22 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Cities Turn Sewage Into 'Black Gold' For Local Farms

Thick jets of processed sewage arc out 30 to 40 feet from giant moving spreaders at Birmingham Farm in Kansas City, Mo.
Frank Morris for NPR

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 12:07 pm

On a normal day, Kansas City, Mo., processes more than 70 million gallons of raw sewage. This sewage used to be a nuisance, but Kansas City, and a lot of municipalities around the country, are now turning it into a resource for city farmers hard up for fertilizer.

After the sewage has been processed at a treatment plant, it's piped out to Birmingham Farm on the north side of the Missouri River.

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Shots - Health News
3:15 pm
Wed April 10, 2013

Feds Fault Preemie Researchers For Ethical Lapses

How much oxygen should severely premature infants receive? A study that sought to answer the question has been criticized for not fully informing parents about the risks to their children.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:04 am

Federal officials say a large study of premature infants was ethically flawed because doctors didn't inform the babies' parents about increased risks of blindness, brain damage and death.

The study involved more than 1,300 severely premature infants at nearly two dozen medical institutions between 2004 and 2009. The infants were randomly assigned to receive two different levels of oxygen to see which was better at preventing blindness without increasing the risk of neurologic damage or death.

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