same-sex marriage

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Same sex couples can continue to get married in North Carolina, after Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision, Obergefell v. Hodges. North Carolina has a ban on same-sex marriage in its constitution, after a voter referendum in 2012, but a federal judge in Asheville struck it down in October 2014.

Tasnim Shamma

Magistrates in North Carolina can now refuse to perform same-sex marriages on religious grounds. This after the House voted Thursday to override Governor McCrory's veto of the legislation.

WFAE’s Tom Bullock reports on the vote in the House and reaction to North Carolina’s new law.

NC General Assembly

North Carolina magistrates can now opt out of performing same-sex marriages on religious grounds.

When Governor Pat McCrory vetoed this bill 13 days ago he wrote, “No public official who voluntarily swears an oath to support and defend the Constitution should be exempt from upholding that oath.”

The Senate quickly voted to override that veto. But in the House the vote had been delayed for more than a week as Speaker Tim Moore and Republican leadership worked to make sure they had the votes they needed.

With the pending U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on gay marriage expected, and the issue of whether North Carolina magistrate’s should be allowed a ‘religious objection’ to performing same-sex marriages, the culture wars over social issues are still being fought in earnest.

Wednesday night was a busy night in Raleigh. First, House lawmakers voted 79-36 to override the governor’s veto of a bill that will allow employers to sue workers who secretly take pictures or record audio in their place of business. The Senate had already voted to override the veto, which means the bill will become law.

Hours after the North Carolina House of Representatives passed the legislation, Governor Pat McCrory announced he will veto a bill that would allow magistrates to opt out of performing marriages for same-sex couples. But lawmakers may have the votes to override that veto.

  Elected leaders from across the Carolinas have weighed in on the same-sex marriage cases the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments over Tuesday. The cases are out of Ohio and three other states, but they'll determine whether any state can ban same-sex marriage.

Courtesy of the Governor's Office

In an hour-long interview with WFAE’s Charlotte Talks Monday, Governor Pat McCrory lashed out at Republican lawmakers in Raleigh for what he sees as bad and misguided legislation. This includes a proposal to redistribute sales tax and what’s become known as ‘The Magistrate Bill.’

Jeff Kubina / Wikimedia Commons

North Carolina's legislative leaders will try to bypass a federal appeals court and take the case over the state's same-sex marriage ban straight to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The U.S. Supreme Court is allowing same-sex marriage to begin in South Carolina. The nation's highest court refused Thursday to delay the marriages pending appeal.