Rise Of The Nones

Sep 3, 2014
Ihar / Flickr

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Quick. Name the fastest growing religious group in America. If you answered “those who have no affiliation at all,” you’d be right. Known as the “nones,” these folks could have a major impact on religion, culture and politics. So who are they and why do they profess a religious belief but no preference for a denomination? Pastor James Emery White set out to find out and he shares those findings with us.


Rowan County

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that opening prayers with references to Christianity during government meetings do not violate the U.S. Constitution.

This decision may impact a trial in Rowan County filed by residents who say they feel excluded when county commissioners open council meetings in the name of Jesus.

As a Jewish youngster in a mostly Catholic neighborhood, Dr. Amy-Jill Levine began her fascination with the New Testament at a young age. She’s now Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, and in that role, she’s written several books about Jesus, about the New Testament and misunderstandings of Jesus as a Jew. She joins us while she’s in the area as Scholar-in-Residence with Temple Emanuel in Gastonia to talk about Jesus, Judaism, and Jewish-Christian relations.

Rowan County

Prayers in government meetings have received a lot of attention in North Carolina. The ACLU has sued the Rowan County Commission, and another group has threatened to sue the Union County Commission for what they say are “sectarian prayers.”

As the U.S. Supreme Court is taking up a similar case from New York next week, we explore what the case could mean for North Carolina.

Women March In White At National Baptist Convention

Sep 5, 2013
Tasnim Shamma

The National Baptist Convention has been in Charlotte all week for its annual session. It’s billed as the nation’s largest and oldest African-American religious convention, and organizers say it attracted people from 49 states and the Bahamas. One of the convention’s signature events was Wednesday’s Women in White March. Women dressed in white (the color of choice for missionaries) to raise money and also show off their state pride. WFAE's Tasnim Shamma produced this audio postcard from the event.

Hanan Shafrir

A group of 22 UNC Charlotte students, some of them Levine scholars, participated in a restricted site excavation in Jerusalem this summer. The site is only a few hundred yards away from the room where the Last Supper is alleged to have taken place. The group has just returned to the United States and they've got big news. The archaeologists announce their discoveries and discuss what’s next, when Charlotte Talks.

Episode 11: Is Charlotte In The Bible Belt?

Jul 12, 2013
Tasnim Shamma

Welcome to A Trifling Place, a podcast dedicated to exploring the ins-and-outs of Charlotte.

When I accepted this job, I knew I was choosing to live in the so-called "Bible Belt". I didn't think much of it at the time, but my travel guidebook on Charlotte warned me to get used to the question, "Which Church Do You Go To?" Or in my case, "Which Mosque Do You Go To?" And it was right.

One of Charlotte's fastest growing evangelical congregations is moving north – and south.

Elevation Church got approval from the town of Cornelius last month for a $5 million renovation of the old Palace Theater to house its Lake Norman worshippers.

On Monday night, the church will seek Charlotte city approval to build a new $20 million facility in Ballantyne, bringing its total outposts in the region to nine.

When someone gets sick, doctors are, for the most part, concerned with curing illness or disease. But in recent years, there has been increased attention on treating the "whole" person - body, mind and spirit. Sometimes a "cure" isn't likely, but there is a possibility of "healing" when treating the whole person. We'll be joined by a panel of doctors, a hospice worker and a person of faith to talk about healing versus curing and the importance of each, when Charlotte Talks.

As you may have heard by now, a joint resolution has been introduced into the North Carolina General Assembly that proclaims religious liberty, especially as it relates to a court case coming out of Rowan County. 

The resolution goes through a number of points, which all deserve some explanation; first, the resolution begins: