Redistricting

Phil Roeder / Flickr

The United States Supreme Court has decided not to take on North Carolina’s partisan redistricting case for now. Instead, the justices are sending the dispute over the state’s Republican-drawn congressional district map back to the lower court.

United States Supreme Court chamber
runJMrun / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

The Supreme Court is choosing not to take on North Carolina's case on partisan redistricting for now.

State judges ruled Friday that primary elections in four Wake County legislative districts can go forward next month, despite a challenge to the boundaries that were redrawn over the past year.  The three-judge panel at Wake County Superior Court in Raleigh said that with candidate filing complete and the election just a few weeks away, it was too late to halt the vote. 

The Supreme Court of the United States.
Matt Wade / Wikimedia Commons

The Supreme Court has already heard a major case about political line-drawing that has the potential to reshape American politics. Now, before even deciding that one, the court is taking up another similar case.

Two years ago David Lewis bragged about his own partisan efforts to elect fellow Republicans.  Now the state representative from Harnett County is angry and says Democrats are doing the same thing. But in a fiery speech Wednesday to make that point, Lewis fell into an age-old trap of contradictions.

Federal judges have approved North Carolina legislative districts redrawn by an expert they hired to address their concerns about continued racial bias with some boundaries and new constitutional violations.

North Carolina General Assembly

When it comes to drawing districts for congressional elections, House Speaker Tim Moore says North Carolina Republicans nailed it.

“Frankly, it's a model other states could follow,” says Moore. 

NC General Assembly

A panel of federal judges has denied a request from Republican lawmakers to delay redrawing all of North Carolina's 13 congressional districts.

A federal court's decision to strike down North Carolina's map of congressional districts has cast uncertainty over this year’s elections.

Federal judges ruled Tuesday that the boundaries drawn by Republican legislators constitute an illegal partisan gerrymander.  The judges gave lawmakers about two weeks to come up with a new map.

 

The federal judges relied heavily on the findings of Duke University mathematics and statistics professor, Dr. Jonathan Mattingly.  He used computer programming and an algorithm to create thousands of simulated congressional districting plans for North Carolina. 

Michael Bitzer
WFAE

In what may be a landmark decision, a federal panel of judges has ruled all of North Carolina's congressional districts are illegal partisan gerrymanders.

They've banned the map from being used in this year's election and ordered the General Assembly to draw new districts by 5pm on January 24th.

Lawmakers are expected to appeal the ruling.

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