Reading law

Nick de la Canal/WFAE

Third graders in North Carolina who aren’t reading at grade level started summer reading camps this week. It’s part of the new third grade reading law. Last year state officials predicted 60 percent of all third-graders would have to enroll in the camps, but in reality, that number is much lower.


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North Carolina students will find it easier this year to pass the state’s standardized tests.  The state board of education decided yesterday to lower the score it would take to be deemed proficient. That means thousands of third-graders will no longer have to attend summer reading camps mandated by the new reading law.

WFAE’s Lisa Miller joins Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt in the studio. 

KK: Lisa, why did the state board decide to do this now?

North Carolina school districts can now use reading tests of their own choosing to decide whether a third-grader must go to a summer reading camp or can go on to fourth grade. The State Board of Education approved the districts’ request today. 

The North Carolina Board of Education will vote today on a measure that could ease some of the testing going on under the new third grade reading law. That law requires third-graders not reading at grade level by the end of the year to go to summer reading camps. So far, it’s been rough. Teachers, even lawmakers who voted for the law, admit it needs tweaking.