Protests

Charlotte Fatal Police Shooting Protests Remain Nonviolent Saturday Night

Sep 25, 2016
Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

Peaceful protests over a fatal police shooting of a black man continued throughout the day and into the night Saturday in Charlotte, even as police released videos of Tuesday’s fatal encounter.

Meanwhile, early Sunday, the city declared the Panthers game an “extraordinary event” meaning extra security is on the way. The game against the Minnesota Vikings is set for 1 p.m. at Bank of America Stadium; protesters were expected to be at the stadium.

Tom Bullock

Throughout the morning we heard from WFAE reporters who were on the ground in Charlotte's Uptown last night, city officials, and from the people who protested. We've pieced together our complete coverage from Thursday's broadcast of Morning Edition to make sure you don't miss a story. 

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why. 

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
Tom Bullock / WFAE

This latest round of protests started peacefully. "It was all cool," said 31-year-old Eddie Thomas, "until riot cops came out. And once the riot cops came out, within five minutes, you had a man on the ground bleeding."

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
Tom Bullock / WFAE

Thursday, September 22

The shooting of an African-American man in the University area on Tuesday afternoon led to protests that became increasingly violent in the overnight hours on Wednesday. Many encouraged on-going protests including a boycott of white-owned Charlotte businesses. City officials encouraged calm and called for dialogue while others say it’s time for systemic change. We're joined by Mayor Jennifer Roberts and other.


Ana Lucia Murillo / WFAE

Protests and vigils have been taking place in Charlotte this weekend in response to last week’s police shootings in Baton Rouge and Minnesota, and the shooting of officers in Dallas.

Protests have continued around the nation and in North Carolina this weekend, aimed at calling attention to police killings of unarmed black men.  In Fayetteville Saturday, marchers waved signs along the curb of Ski-bo Road, chanting "Hands Up, Don't Shoot." Passing motorists honked their horns in support.  Police didn't have an estimate of the number of marchers.  And in downtown Charlotte yesterday afternoon, about 60 people protested at Trade and Tryon streets.

Black Lives Matter die-in protest in Davidson
Jonathan Cox/DavidsonNews.net

More than 125 Davidson College students and some faculty members staged a ‘die-in’ protest Saturday night, lying down in the middle of Main Street during the Christmas in Davidson festival. Our news partner DavidsonNews.net reports the students were calling for justice in recent incidents of violence and alleged police brutality against black people.

Postal Workers Fear Expansion Of Staples Pilot Program

Apr 24, 2014
Tasnim Shamma

About two dozen Postal Service employees protested uptown today because they fear more of their work will be outsourced to Staples.

The protest was in response to a comment made by the Postmaster General, in which he said he was so pleased with a pilot program with Staples that he would like to see a post office counter in all 1,500 Staples stores.


gnuru / flickr

For the last several Mondays, planned protests have been happening at the North Carolina General Assembly and resulting in hundreds of arrests. These "Moral Monday" demonstrations have brought out thousands of people over the course of the last several weeks, who are protesting policies on many topics, from education, to taxes, and healthcare and more. The coalition of groups coordinating the protests, led by Rev. Dr. William Barber of the NC NAACP have implied that the protests won't stop until changes are made in the legislature. We'll talk about the Moral Monday movement, about the policies that are being challenged, about the number of people voluntarily being arrested in the protests and the chance these demonstrations will make change, when Charlotte Talks.

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