Population

Demography Changes, Implications

Mar 5, 2015
UN World Urbanization Prospects Report, 2014 Update

9:00, Thursday, March 5, 2015

Charlotte and Raleigh will grow faster than any other large cities in the U.S. over the next fifteen years, according to a projection from a new United Nations study of world population growth. Growth is expected to reach 71 percent in that time frame. This expansion is due in part to a strong economy and low cost of living. What this growth means is shifting demographics thanks to a rise in foreign immigration and return migration of people back into the South. But what do these demography shifts mean for demands on health care, implications to politics and business and innovation? 

UN World Urbanization Prospects Report, 2014 Update

North Carolina’s two largest urban centers—Charlotte and Raleigh—will grow faster than any other large cities in the U.S. over the next fifteen years, according to a projection from a new United Nations study of world population growth.


Charlotte In 2053: Long Island, New York?

Feb 15, 2013

What will Charlotte look like in 40 years? A couple of pages found tucked in the middle of a routine City Council report reveal some interesting things about the city’s future.

Staff prepared the report to answer questions from City Council transportation committee members about employment and population in the Charlotte area.

Here are the highlights:

Charlotte: A City Of Mortgage-Debtors

Jan 11, 2013

More homeowners in Charlotte have mortgage debt than in most other major metro areas around the country.  Are we just prone to big spending, or is something else at play in the housing market here?  

Almost 21 million Americans – nearly a third of the nation's homeowners – own their homes outright.

In Charlotte, the percentage is much lower – just 20 percent.  New York City outdoes us with 30 percent of its homeowners free and clear. In Tampa it's 33.2 percent and Pittsburgh – a whopping 38 percent of homeowners have completely paid off the mortgage.