Politics

Michael Bitzer
WFAE

Once upon a time, a political party was faced with the loss of a branch of government to its political nemesis. It came following a rancorous and bitter election, which saw the sitting incumbent defeated in his bid for re-election. Before the opposition was sworn in, however, the lame-duck party in power decided to use the rules of the game of politics, and its majority status, to ensure its presence within the structure of government, all to the dismay and abhorrence of the incoming opposition party.

David Boraks / WFAE

North Carolina's political scene has been full of surprises lately, like last week's unexpected special legislative session to limit the governor's powers. This week, it was the Charlotte City Council's turn. Monday, the council unexpectedly repealed an ordinance expanding legal protections for LGBT people. Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks with WFAE reporter David Boraks, who’s been following the news out of both Raleigh and Charlotte.

When it comes to House Bill 2, time can apparently heal some wounds. Three months ago, Charlotte City Council refused an overture from the General Assembly. The deal was that if council repealed the city’s expansion of its non-discrimination ordinance, lawmakers would vote to repeal HB2. Most council members, including LaWana Mayfield, weren't interested.

Michael Tomsic

Charlotte City Council voted unanimously Monday to repeal LGBT protections the city adopted in February. Council members say they've come around to a deal Republican state leaders have been offering to get rid of House Bill 2, which invalidated Charlotte's protections anyway.

Activists groups like Equality NC and the Human Rights Campaign say they will fight to reinstate protections that were nullified by the Charlotte City Council in a surprise vote Monday morning.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts, Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles, Council member Julie Eiseldt
Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Governor-elect Roy Cooper says Republican leaders of the North Carolina General Assembly will call a special session Tuesday to repeal House Bill 2. That follows a surprise move from the Charlotte City Council, which Monday morning voted unanimously to repeal its own expansion of the city’s nondiscrimination ordinance. Joining host Nick de la Canal for more on this is WFAE’s David Boraks. 

After an acrimonious day that led to protests and arrests, lawmakers are likely to give final approval Friday to bills that would remove executive powers.

On Thursday, hundreds of protesters gathered at the N.C. General Assembly to voice their opposition to these Republican policy proposals and chanted in unison, "Shame! Shame! Shame! Shame! Forward together, not one step back!"

State Republican leaders are trying to limit the power of Governor-elect Roy Cooper during their surprise special session. One of the justifications from Senate Leader Phil Berger is that Democrats did the same thing when they were in power.

Jayron32 of English Wikipedia

Plans by Republican lawmakers to limit the powers of incoming Governor Roy Cooper have drawn fire from Democrats. They call it a power grab and unconstitutional. But to others, it's all just part of North Carolina politics …  and history.

Governor-elect Cooper said in a press conference Thursday the legislature's moves are unprecedented. He even threatened a lawsuit.

“If I believe that laws passed by the legislature hurt working families, and are unconstitutional, they will see me in court,” Cooper said.

Michael Tomsic

As the U.S. Supreme Court works toward a ruling on how North Carolina redrew its voting districts, a state senator from Mecklenburg County is continuing his call for independent redistricting. Democratic Sen. Jeff Jackson said the current process results in almost no competitive races.

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