Politics

NC Legislature

The immediate aftermath of the General Assembly’s failure to repeal House Bill 2 in special session Wednesday was predictable. Democrats blamed Republicans. Republicans blamed Democrats. Opposing activist groups went on the attack. In short, the political spin cycle was on high.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

It’s been another day of surprises with House Bill 2, Charlotte, and the city’s non-discrimination ordinance. The Charlotte City Council met again Wednesday morning to take action aimed at convincing state lawmakers to repeal House Bill 2.

That’s what council did Monday, too. Whether it’ll work still isn’t clear.

State lawmakers were scheduled to begin discussing the repeal of House Bill 2 at 10 a.m. Wednesday morning, but shortly after the House and Senate gaveled themselves in, both went into recess, postponing discussion until well into the afternoon.

The General Assembly is meeting at this hour to discuss repealing House Bill 2, though the repeal effort was thrown into turmoil when rumors began circulating Tuesday that the Charlotte City Council had not fully repealed its entire nondiscrimination ordinance. WFAE’s David Boraks talks to host Nick de la Canal to help clear things up.

charlottenc.gov

North Carolina’s General Assembly is in a special session Wednesday discussing whether to repeal House Bill 2, the controversial state law that restricted LGBT protections. The repeal effort was thrown into question after reports surfaced that the Charlotte City Council left some portions of its ordinance that started this fight intact. There's been a lot of confusion around what city council did, so here's a primer.

Some Uncertainty Over Repeal of HB2

Dec 21, 2016
Mayor Jennifer Roberts, Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles, Council member Julie Eiseldt
Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

UPDATE: Charlotte City Council scheduled an emergency meeting at 9:00 this morning to address concerns that the council did not completely repeal the city's non-discrimination ordinance.  State lawmakers made getting rid of the ordinance a condition of repealing HB2. There are reports that some state lawmakers refuse to support the repeal because they say they don't think city council repealed its ordinance in its entirety.

Michael Bitzer
WFAE

Once upon a time, a political party was faced with the loss of a branch of government to its political nemesis. It came following a rancorous and bitter election, which saw the sitting incumbent defeated in his bid for re-election. Before the opposition was sworn in, however, the lame-duck party in power decided to use the rules of the game of politics, and its majority status, to ensure its presence within the structure of government, all to the dismay and abhorrence of the incoming opposition party.

David Boraks / WFAE

North Carolina's political scene has been full of surprises lately, like last week's unexpected special legislative session to limit the governor's powers. This week, it was the Charlotte City Council's turn. Monday, the council unexpectedly repealed an ordinance expanding legal protections for LGBT people. Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks with WFAE reporter David Boraks, who’s been following the news out of both Raleigh and Charlotte.

When it comes to House Bill 2, time can apparently heal some wounds. Three months ago, Charlotte City Council refused an overture from the General Assembly. The deal was that if council repealed the city’s expansion of its non-discrimination ordinance, lawmakers would vote to repeal HB2. Most council members, including LaWana Mayfield, weren't interested.

Michael Tomsic

Charlotte City Council voted unanimously Monday to repeal LGBT protections the city adopted in February. Council members say they've come around to a deal Republican state leaders have been offering to get rid of House Bill 2, which invalidated Charlotte's protections anyway.

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