police shooting

K(no)w Justice K(no)w Peace display
Sarah Delia

The phrase “No Justice, No Peace” has been heard around the country during protests in the wake of police involved shootings of African-Americans. It was a chant that rang out in the streets of Uptown back in September after the shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott by a CMPD officer.

Now, it’s the title of an exhibit at the Levine Museum of the New South. WFAE’s Sarah Delia got a sneak peek of the exhibit which opens to the public Friday.

A Fayetteville man who pled guilty to threatening members of a North Carolina mosque has been sentenced to eight months of home confinement.

Video from Officer Bell's dash camera:

Video of two CMPD officers fatally shooting an 18-year-old last June seems to corroborate the officers' accounts. Police stopped Smith on North Tryon after he shot someone in the ankle on a CATS bus. CMPD released the video Thursday after a judge issued an order for police to do so. The body and dash cam video is the first to be released under a new state law that requires requests for police video to go through court.  

CMPD

Two CMPD officers who shot and killed an 18-year-old man in June will not face criminal prosecution. The Mecklenburg County District Attorney says officers Michael Bell and Garret Tryon were justified in using deadly force against Rodney Smith. Part of the evidence that helped prosecutors come to that decision was video from one of the officers body camera. 

Mecklenburg District Attorney Andrew Murray announces no charges will be filed in the police shooting of Keith Scott.
David Boraks / WFAE

The Charlotte Mecklenburg police officer who shot and killed an African-American man in September will not face any charges. Mecklenburg County’s district attorney said Tuesday all the evidence supports officer Brentley Vinson’s claim that he felt threatened.

In April, 2015, then-Charleston police officer Michael Slager allegedly shot an unarmed black man, Walter Scott, eight times in the back as he fled a traffic stop. Now, nearly a year and a half later, a court will decide whether Slager was justified in the shooting.

Attorneys for the prosecution and the defense delivered opening statements Thursday to a jury of 11 white people and one black man who were selected earlier in the week.

Michael Tomsic / WFAE

A private autopsy was released late Wednesday for Keith L. Scott, the 43 year old African-American whose deadly encounter with police last month sparked riots and protests across Charlotte.

Michael Tomsic / WFAE

Updated Friday, 4:30 a.m.
The family of Keith Scott wants the public to see videos of Scott being shot and killed by police Tuesday.  Members of the Scott family viewed dash-cam and body camera videos of the shooting Thursday. 

The family's lawyers issued a statement afterward, saying the videos raise more questions than answers. They say it’s impossible to tell from the videos, "what, if anything," Scott was holding when officer Brentley Vinson shot him in an apartment complex near UNC Charlotte.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

Wednesday night’s protests in uptown Charlotte over a fatal police shooting began with a peaceful rally at Trade and Tryon streets. But then the crowd went in different directions: Some wound up listening to speeches of unity at an uptown church as others confronted police.

In northeast Charlotte Tuesday, a Charlotte Mecklenburg police officer shot and killed a black man. That prompted a night of angry protests. Police say they’re still investigating but here’s what we know:

Officers went to an apartment complex off Old Concord Road to serve an arrest warrant. They saw 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott sitting in a parked car. Police say he got out of the car with a gun, and that’s when officer Brentley Vinson, also an African-American, fired.

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