Pat McCrory

Center For Public Integrity

Consider for a moment this number, 66,636.

As of October 24, that is the number of political ads aired in North Carolina this election year. And just for state level races, think governor on down.

Now money in politics, that should not surprise you. But these numbers might. "The estimated cost of those ads is about $32 million." That’s Ben Weider from the Center for Public Integrity. The totals reached by pouring through data primarily compiled by Kantar Media.


Based on the heated rhetoric in the North Carolina governor's race, the State Crime Lab is either a broken, corrupt lab that prevents justice, or it's an efficient operation that puts thousands of killers and rapists behind bars. The lab is part of the office of Attorney General Roy Cooper, a Democrat now running for governor.


Tuesday night three men took the stage for the final North Carolina gubernatorial debate of 2016. And while Libertarian candidate Lon Cecil remained rather calm, Republican Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper got down right testy with each other. WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry with a recap and some fact checking.

Screen shot / WRAL

For an hour last night Republican Governor Pat McCrory and Democratic Attorney General Roy Cooper attacked each other’s policies, priorities, and political records. The two men vying to be governor met for a debate just four weeks before Election Day. WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry now for a recap.

Robeson County officials say another man has died in North Carolina as a result of Hurricane Matthew. Officials say the man was inside his car when flood waters washed away the vehicle. The man’s name has not been released. It brings the number of deaths in North Carolina blamed on Hurricane Matthew up to 15.

We've got the first televised gubernatorial debate coming up on Tuesday. NBC's Chuck Todd is moderating, pointing to the national attention this race is getting. This week we look at what's been going on in the gubernatorial race and what to expect going into the debate.

Roy Cooper
David Boraks / WFAE

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Roy Cooper told a business lunch in Charlotte Tuesday that the laws and policies of Gov. Pat McCrory and Republicans are damaging the state's reputation. Cooper says he'll work with citizens and business leaders to repair it.

Cooper, currently the state’s attorney general, made his pitch for the governor's job at the Hood Hargett Breakfast Club at the Palm Restaurant, where McCrory spoke last week.

Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts and some city council members have rejected a compromise that state Republican leaders offered on the controversial House Bill 2. They said they have no plans to vote Monday night on repealing their expansion of the city’s non-discrimination ordinance, which prompted the law.

There is a chance House Bill 2 could be repealed, in its entirety, next week.

That’s according to both Governor Pat McCrory’s office and a North Carolina lobbying group. But there are some major hurdles to overcome, the first comes on Monday night.

Governor Pat McCrory speaking at the Hood Hargett Breakfast Club in Charlotte
Tom Bullock / WFAE

House Bill 2 was on the mind of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton  during a campaign stop Wednesday afternoon at UNC-Greensboro.

"I’m running for the LGBT teenager here in North Carolina, who sees your governor sign a bill legalizing discrimination, and suddenly feels like a second class citizen," Clinton said to applause.

Meanwhile, with this week’s announcement of college championship boycotts from both the NCAA and ACC still fresh, Governor Pat McCrory paid a visit to a group of Charlotte business leaders.