NPR Sports

Sports
10:28 am
Wed June 4, 2014

An Inability To Connect With Horses Isn't Why Racing Is Failing

Hoke, like most off-the-track thoroughbreds, had to be treated for ulcers that he incurred from the stress of racing.
Laurel Dalrymple

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 7:53 am

People don't connect with horses. That is the reason some people say horse racing is failing. Horse racing needs a hero to revive the sport, they say. And that is why all eyes on Saturday will be on California Chrome, the favorite going into the Belmont Stakes, the last and most grueling leg of the Triple Crown.

Columnist Frank Deford writes:

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Sports
5:11 am
Wed June 4, 2014

No Americans Are Left In French Open

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 8:32 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tennis's French Open has reached quarterfinal stage with plenty of big names advancing. None of them, though, are American, we should point out. The U.S. men and women have all been shut-out in singles action.

For the hometown crowd at the Roland Garros Tennis Complex today, though, they get to cheer on one of their own countrymen - and here to tell us more - Sports Illustrated, Jon Wertheim, in Paris. Jon, welcome back to the program.

JON WERTHEIM: Oh, thanks, David.

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Sweetness And Light
3:39 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Will A Triple Crown Win Save Horse Racing? Don't Bet On It

Even if California Chrome wins Saturday's Belmont Stakes, most Americans are too disconnected from horses to flock to the race track, says commentator Frank Deford.
Al Bello Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 8:32 am

At the start of a movie these days, how often do you read: "Based on a true story?" But if a movie was made about California Chrome, whether or not the horse wins the Belmont Stakes on Saturday, it would read: "Based on a dream."

Because the colt — of the most undistinguished heritage, bred by neophytes and trained by a kindly septuagenarian –– well, the whole thing is a ridiculous reverie.

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Sports
6:22 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

Why Is It So Hard For A Horse To Win The Triple Crown?

Birdstone (right), ridden by Edgar Prado, upsets horse Smarty Jones to win the Belmont Stakes in 2004. Smarty Jones was one of a dozen horses since 1978 to win the first two legs of the Triple Crown, only to lose at the Belmont.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 10:38 am

Only one more race stands between California Chrome and horse racing's Triple Crown, but it could be his toughest challenge yet.

Since 1978, a dozen horses — Sunday Silence, War Emblem and Smarty Jones among them — have won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness, only to stumble before the finish line at the Belmont Stakes.

No one can say exactly why there's been a 36-year drought since the last Triple Crown winner, but there are several theories.

An Endurance Test

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Sports
5:33 pm
Tue June 3, 2014

'A Change-up On Steroids:' The History Of A Sky-Scraping Pitch

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 12:20 am

In a recent Nippon Professional Baseball game in Japan, Kazuhito Tadano threw a slow, arcing pitch that caught the batter by surprise. Video of the play quickly went viral on the Internet, but the pitch has a history — and a name: the eephus pitch. Paul Dickson, author of the Dickson Baseball Dictionary, offers more details.

The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

91-Year-Old Woman Breaks Marathon Record

Harriette Thompson meets the press at the finish line of the Suja Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Marathon on Sunday
Jerod Harris Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:14 pm

It took Harriette Thompson more than seven hours to run a marathon Sunday in San Diego. But that was awfully good, considering she's 91 and recovering from cancer.

In fact, she beat the previous record for women 90 and up by two hours and 45 minutes. She also became the second-oldest woman to complete a marathon in U.S. history, according to the running site Competitor.com.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Mon June 2, 2014

L.A. Kings Earn Shot At Stanley Cup With Win Over Chicago Blackhawks

Jarret Stoll (No. 28) of the Los Angeles Kings celebrates his team's game-winning goal in Game 7 of the Western Conference Finals. Kings defenseman Alec Martinez scored in overtime with a shot that deflected off the Chicago Blackhawks' Nick Leddy (left).
Tasos Katopodis Getty Images

The L.A. Kings beat the Chicago Blackhawks 5-4 on Sunday, advancing to the Stanley Cup Final in a dramatic Game 7 overtime win.

The Blackhawks, the defending Stanley Cup champions, scored the first two goals of the game and led through the first period. The Kings tied the score at 3-3 partway through the second period, but Chicago took the lead again a few minutes before the second intermission.

The Kings caught back up at 7:17 of the third period. Missed shots and frantic saves carried the game into overtime.

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Sports
6:52 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Corruption Allegations Surface Before World Cup Opens

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 7:48 am

The organization governing world soccer apparently has proof that an Asian gambling syndicate fixed World Cup matches in 2010. Steve Inskeep talks to Jere Longman of The New York Times.

Sports
6:32 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Chicago Blackhawks' Social Media Team Sends Obscene Tweet

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 7:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Sports
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Why Cities Find The Olympics Games Are Losing Their Appeal

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Slate.com's Mike Pesca about the record $2 billion purchase of the LA Clippers, and about why no one wants to host the 2022 Winter Olympics.

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