NPR Business

Business
5:07 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Troubles Continue For 787 Dreamliner With Groundings In Japan

Originally published on Fri January 18, 2013 7:16 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

There are new and bigger troubles today for the Boeing 787, the airplane known as the Dreamliner. Late today, the FAA grounded the U.S. fleet of 787s for safety checks. The grounding and inspection order will likely be implemented around the world. The move comes after two serious battery-related problems occurred on two different Dreamliners in the past 10 days. Here's NPR's Wendy Kaufman.

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The Two-Way
4:29 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

JPMorgan Chase Sees Profits Rise, Halves CEO's Salary For London Debacle

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:41 am

JPMorgan Chase reports that its profits were up 53 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012 — but CEO Jamie Dimon's pay will be cut in half, after the bank lost billions of dollars on risky bets made in its London office. The incident tarnished the reputation of Dimon, who had successfully steered his bank through the recent financial crisis.

"This past year has been a bruising one for Dimon," as NPR's Steve Henn reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Wed January 16, 2013

Outsourced: Employee Sends Own Job To China; Surfs Web

Plugged in, but not at work: Web security personnel were called in to find out how a company's network was being accessed from China. They found that an employee had outsourced his own job.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 6:41 am

What began as a company's suspicion that its infrastructure was being hacked turned into a case of a worker outsourcing his own job to a Chinese consulting firm, according to reports that cite an investigation by Verizon's security team. The man was earning a six-figure salary.

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Business
11:57 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Small Business Owners Turn To Friends For Money

Starting a small business hasn't been easy lately. People are now turning to their peers for funding after being denied credit from big banks. But that has its own set of risks and rewards. Host Michel Martin explores the future of small business in 2013.

The Two-Way
8:51 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Inflation Rate Slowed Sharply In 2012; Prices Were Flat In December

The cost of a gallon of gas kept rising last year, but not at the torrid pace of 2010 and 2011. That helped keep inflation in check.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 10:21 am

Consumer prices rose just 1.7 percent in 2012, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. That's about half the pace of 2011 — when prices went up 3 percent.

In December, BLS says, prices were unchanged.

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Business
5:37 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 6:52 am

The new figure predicts the world economy will grow by only 2.4 percent this year — lower than the 3 percent the World Bank predicted last June. Among the reasons the bank cited for the new forecast: the continued economic weakness of developed countries.

Business
5:37 am
Wed January 16, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 6:56 am

The online retailer Cafe Press is happy to sell you inaugural mouse pads, shot glasses, and mugs. And the merchandise is bipartisan, including a sweatshirt with the message: "I was Anti-Obama Before It Was Cool."

NPR Story
5:31 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Who Is The Real Victims Of The NHL Lockout?

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 5:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The lockout is over and the much delayed National Hockey League's season is now set to begin on Saturday. The regular season will run 48 games instead of the usual 82.

So what's the economic effect of missing almost half the season? NPR's Mike Pesca finds, not as bad as you might think.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: We've all seen the reports during the lockout, the empty bar near the arena should be brimming with Bruins backers or a Washington Avalanche acolytes. Or maybe it's not a bar. Maybe it's pizza in Pittsburgh.

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NPR Story
5:31 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Sick Workers' Dilemma: Stay Home Or Go To Work?

Chaim Gross, 24, is known as "Patient Zero" at his company Zeno Radio. About half of the workers have fallen ill in the past couple of months.
Ailsa Chang NPR

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 8:18 am

As the earliest flu outbreak in years continues to claim victims, businesses are taking a hit, too. They're faced with an unsolvable problem: If they tell too many sick employees to stay home, the work doesn't get done. But when people sick with flu and other bugs show up, they're spreading illness through the workplace.

It's a dilemma the staff at Zeno Radio, a media technology company in Midtown Manhattan, has seen unfold this winter.

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Planet Money
3:41 am
Wed January 16, 2013

Is Herbalife A Pyramid Scheme?

Susan Goldman AP

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 6:34 pm

Herbalife, a company that sells weight loss shakes, vitamins and other similar products, is worth billions of dollars. The company has been around for more than 30 years, and it's traded on the New York Stock Exchange.

Bill Ackman thinks the whole thing is a pyramid scheme.

Ackman manages a hedge fund that has shorted more than a billion dollars' worth of Herbalife stock. If the stock falls — and Ackman says he thinks it will fall all the way to zero — the fund will make money.

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