NPR Business

Business
5:19 am
Sun July 13, 2014

Congress' Latest Death Match Involves A Bank You've Never Heard Of

A worker stacks traffic safety poles at Pexco's manufacturing center in Fife, Wash. The small company ships products all over the world, with the help of federal insurance from the Export-Import Bank.
Drew Perine MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 1:39 pm

It sits in an imposing building just across Lafayette Square from the White House. Yet the Export-Import Bank, which has been offering credit to foreign purchasers of U.S. goods for 80 years, could start shutting down operations within a matter of weeks.

"There's about a 50-50 chance," says Dan Ikenson, who directs a trade policy center at the Cato Institute.

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Sat July 12, 2014

Tracy Morgan Sues Wal-Mart Over Truck-Limousine Crash

Tracy Morgan attends One Night Only: An All-Star Tribute To Don Rickles in May, a few weeks before the crash that seriously injured him and killed fellow comedian James McNair.
Charles Sykes AP

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 2:59 pm

Comedian Tracy Morgan, who was seriously hurt last month when his limousine was hit by a Wal-Mart truck going 20 mph over the speed limit, is suing the retail giant for negligence.

The complaint, filed Thursday in U.S. District Court in New Jersey, says that Wal-Mart should have known that the driver of the truck had been awake 24 hours and alleges that he fell asleep at the wheel.

The Associated Press says:

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Parallels
8:08 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Financial Scandals Tarnish Spanish Soccer Glory

Barcelona football star Lionel Messi (right) leaves a courthouse in Gava, Spain, in September 2013, after a hearing on tax evasion charges. Messi and his father paid $6.5 million to try to settle the case, but his father may still go on trial.
Josep Lago AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 12, 2014 12:12 pm

Many of the biggest stars in global soccer — Neymar, Messi, Ronaldo — play the regular season with club teams in Spain. Their marquee names have helped their Spanish teams get filthy rich. Real Madrid and FC Barcelona top Forbes magazine's list of the world's richest sports franchises. You have to scroll down to No. 4 to find the New York Yankees, and NFL teams below that.

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NPR Ed
5:37 am
Sat July 12, 2014

How Private Colleges Are Like Cheap Sushi

Originally published on Tue July 22, 2014 6:02 pm

In New York City's East Village, there are a number of hole-in-the-wall spots that advertise sushi at 50 percent off. But I can never bring myself to sample the goods. We're talking about a delicacy flown in from around the world. Marking it down drastically just doesn't sit right. Something — either the price, or the fish — has to be a little off.

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All Tech Considered
5:36 am
Sat July 12, 2014

Tech Week: Google's World Cup Play, Amazon Sued And Kids Tracked

Amazon, led by CEO Jeff Bezos, faces a federal lawsuit over unauthorized in-app purchases by children.
David Ryder Getty Images

Summertime in the tech world has made us eager for some lighter news, which you can find below. But the weightier legal battles in technology continue, as highlighted in our Big Conversation section. And links we think you should see are filed under Curiosities. Have a great weekend, readers.

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The Salt
5:03 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Spread Of Palm Oil Production Into Africa Threatens Great Apes

Gorillas in Virunga National Park in Democratic Republic of Congo, in 2013. Great apes like the gorilla have become increasingly threatened by the expansion of palm oil production in Africa.
Brent Stirton WWF/Canon/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 11:10 pm

In recent years, consumers have grown increasingly aware that the explosion of palm oil plantations to supply food companies making everything from Pop-Tarts to ramen noodles has taken a heavy toll on the environment.

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The Two-Way
4:38 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Newspaper Editor, Activist John Seigenthaler Dies At 86

Nashville Tennessean Editor John Seigenthaler testifies at a Senate Commerce Subcommittee hearing in Washington in 1969. Seigenthaler died Friday at 86.
Bob Daugherty AP

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 4:58 pm

John Seigenthaler, the legendary journalist who edited The Tennessean, was instrumental in shaping the editorial page of USA Today and worked as an assistant to Robert Kennedy, has died at 86.

A statement from his son, broadcast journalist John Seigenthaler Jr., said his father died "peacefully at home," where he was recovering after a recent medical treatment.

NPR's David Folkenflik says Seigenthaler was known as a crusader against corruption and for civil rights.

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Business
4:11 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Declining Domestic Sales Speed Talks For Tobacco Mega-Merger

Originally published on Sun July 13, 2014 1:03 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block. The U.S. tobacco industry could be in for a shakeup. Reynolds American, the maker of cigarette brands such as Camel and Pall Mall, confirmed today that it's in talks to buy its smaller rival, Lorillard. As NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports, the potential merger comes as the industry feels the pinch of declining sales.

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Sports
12:24 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

With Brazil Out Of The World Cup, Was The Price Tag Worth It?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Business
7:02 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Economists Say Inflation Is Tame; Consumers Aren't Buying It

Meat is displayed in a case at a grocery store in Miami. The index of retail prices for meats, poultry, fish and eggs was up 7.7 percent from a year ago — more than triple the overall inflation rate.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 9:15 am

Economists regularly issue reports calling inflation tame or mild, or some other word that suggests consumers shouldn't be feeling much pain.

One example: "Inflation has been tame and this is providing households with some relief" from economic stress, according to an assessment done this week by PNC Financial Services.

But if you happen to be buying gasoline or groceries, you may not be feeling relieved — at all.

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