North Carolina

The North Carolina legislature is poised to pass a temporary fix to prevent more than 1,300 people in group homes from losing their place to live. The legislation allows them to continue receiving Medicaid services in their group homes until July.

This is probably the last temporary fix for people in group homes with a mental illness, developmental disability or Alzheimer's.

In his first State of the State address, Gov. Pat McCrory Monday night pledged to work to lower North Carolina's income tax rates, cut the amount of money the state wastes on Medicaid, and make vocational training a larger part of the state's education system.

Gov. McCrory said his administration will focus on "fixing the economy, transforming education and improving government efficiency." Here's the first step:

Governor Pat McCrory said Tuesday morning that North Carolina is not ready to participate in two major parts of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. At least for now, the state will not expand Medicaid or be involved in running a health insurance exchange.

Governor Bev Perdue announced Tuesday a temporary stopgap to keep about 1,400 North Carolinians from potentially becoming homeless next month. Perdue is moving money around to allow people with mental illnesses and developmental disabilities to continue receiving care in group homes.

As is often the case with disability issues in North Carolina, this one evolved from a lawsuit.

Courtesy of the State of North Carolina

Surveyors have been working for nearly 20 years to determine the exact path of the North Carolina and South Carolina border. And it will still be another few months before we know the official state lines. 

Alex Rankin has been walking and hiking much of the state line with his team for the last 12 years. He's president of the Concord engineering and surveying firm commissioned to rediscover the state boundary that was first drawn in the 1700s.       

North Carolina leaders are still deciding whether they'll expand Medicaid to cover almost 680,000 more uninsured adults. The expansion became an optional part of President Obama's health care law because of a Supreme Court ruling.

A major goal of the Affordable Care Act is to give every American access to health insurance. For low-income people, the Medicaid expansion is a huge part of that.

In a previous post, I noted that the United States is seeing a pattern of “regionalism” when it comes to presidential elections.  Since 2000, both parties have dominated in two sets of regions, while one region consistently plays the “battleground” status to determining who wins the White House.

N.C. Department of Insurance

North Carolina is partnering with the federal government to set up a health insurance exchange. The exchange is a required part of President Obama's health care law, and it's supposed to be an online shop where people can compare and buy health insurance.

crownjewel82/Flickr

North Carolina election officials are asking counties to double check their voting registrations. That comes after Mecklenburg County found questionable registrations turned in by Strategic Allied Consulting, the company hired by the Republican Party and accused of submitting fake registrations in Florida.

The Mecklenburg County Board of Elections caught wind of some fishy registrations two weeks ago.

Are You Feeling Polling Fatigue?

Sep 25, 2012
Flickr/Karolina Kabat

We've all received unwanted phone calls. From friends, family … maybe even your boss (thank goodness, for Caller ID, right?)

Telemarketers have certainly earned a reputation for interrupting us, but we can block many of those calls with the national Do-Not-Call registry.

But since it’s election season, the likely culprit of annoyance is a political candidate, a third party interest group, or maybe a media outlet conducting a poll. The point is, polls are everywhere.

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