North Carolina health care

Wendy Herkey

One of North Carolina's U.S. senators says the partial government shutdown is already hurting the state in large and small ways. It's the result of House Republicans refusing to pass a once-routine budget procedure unless they can defund or delay the president's health care law.

Now Senator Kay Hagan, a Democrat up for reelection next year, says her office can't meet one of its most basic responsibilities for constituents – helping North Carolinians who call or show up with a wide variety of questions. 

Brendan Greaves / Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park

Sometimes one new possum law just isn't enough.

This week we've been examining some of the ways North Carolina laws are changing. The changes are the result of the legislative session that ended last week – the first in more than a century in which Republicans controlled both the General Assembly and the governor's mansion. We've addressed gun rights, abortion, education, and voting rights. This morning, we're going a different direction. We finish our series with some of the quirky legislation that passed.

North Carolinians should soon have an easier time understanding their medical bills and comparing the cost of common procedures at different hospitals. Those are among the goals of legislation the General Assembly passed Thursday.

University of North Carolina

On October 17, generations of North Carolina leaders gathered in Chapel Hill to remember UNC System President Emeritus Bill Friday. Friday is widely credited with creating the 16 campus state university system. And, for the last three decades, he was in the homes of UNC-TV viewers as the host of “North Carolina People.” But Friday also had a hand in the establishment of WFAE.