north carolina congressional redistricting

This ruling comes as many congressional candidates are getting ready to file for office. The primary is set for May 8 and it’s a familiar situation for two Republicans running in the state’s 9th Congressional district.

NC General Assembly

The headline of Tuesday's federal ruling is an eye-catching one: All 13 North Carolina congressional districts are illegal partisan gerrymanders. The deadline was equally eye-catching. The judges gave lawmakers just two weeks to redraw the whole map.

So did all this catch the eyes of lawmakers in Raleigh?

Not visibly. But that doesn’t mean things aren’t happening behind the scene.  

Alex Olgin / WFAE

Voters around the state told lawmakers what they think of newly-drawn legislative districts Tuesday.  The maps released late last week were drawn to comply with a Supreme Court order that found 28 state legislative districts were illegal racial gerrymanders.  

Duke University / www.math.duke.edu

Republicans picked up three seats in North Carolina's 2012 congressional elections. The election used districts that had been redrawn by the state's Republican-controlled legislature following the 2010 census. Political gerrymandering is nothing new, but does it thwart the "will of the people" on election day? Researchers at Duke University say a mathematical model they've developed shows that if the exact same votes in 2012 had been cast in differently-drawn districts, the overall results would have changed. WFAE's Mark Rumsey discussed the findings with Jonathan Mattingly, a Duke math professor and one of the study's authors.