News In Brief

A midday news roundup. 

A South Carolina judge says the special prosecutor overseeing an investigation into corruption at the Statehouse can stay on the case. 

The North Carolina man who fired an assault rifle inside a District of Columbia pizzeria has been sentenced to 4 year in prison. Meanwhile, North Carolina Senate Leader Phil Berger says legislators "will quickly override" Gov. Roy Cooper should he chose to veto the Republican-backed budget. And, Duke Energy is moving forward with its request to raise rates by 15 percent for 1.3 million North Carolina customers.

Paul Megget will become Charlotte School of Law's third dean in as many months. Meanwhile, the Mecklenburg County Commission has approved two budget plans, one a $1.7 billion operating budget for FY2018, the other a $1.5 billion long-term capital improvement plan. And, the proposed North Carolina state budget continues to move quickly through the General Assembly.

South Carolina voters are heading to the polls Tuesday to choose a replacement for former Congressman Mick Mulvaney, who now leads the White House Budget Office. Meanwhile, Charlotte's three Democratic mayoral candidates are preparing for a public forum to be held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, and legislators in the North Carolina General Assembly are preparing to vote on a proposed state budget deal.

Here are Tuesday afternoon's top headlines on WFAE.

Murders were reported on Sunday in both Charlotte and Hickory. Meanwhile, police are asking for help finding the driver of a white SUV who struck and killed another man on Freedom Drive, then left the scene. And N.C. civil rights leader William Barber and other activists have been banned from the state legislature after his arrest in recent health care protest.

The number of homicides in Charlotte this year is now up to 40. That’s after police announced charges against two people in separate cases over the past 24 hours. 

A judge has declared a mistrial in the case of a North Carolina minister charged with beating a gay congregant. Meanwhile, an appeals court has affirmed North Carolina's decision to refuse compensation to the relatives of people involuntarily sterilized by the North Carolina who died before a state deadline, and, Gov. Roy Cooper has pledged his support for the Paris Climate Accord after President Trump announced he would withdraw the U.S. from the agreement.

Here are some of Tuesday afternoon's top headlines on WFAE.

Mecklenburg County is banning all swimming near a cove on Lake Norman after nearly 400 gallons of sewage spilled into the water Thursday. Meanwhile, fire investigators in Raleigh say they still haven't determined what caused a $50 million fire at an unfinished apartment building in March. And, police in Charlotte are investigating after an infant was allegedly abandoned by her mother overnight.

Here are some of Friday afternoon's top headlines on WFAE.

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster has signed a new law that closes loopholes in the state's Freedom of Information Act. Meanwhile, the North Carolina House of Representatives remains on track toward getting its state budget bill approved by the end of the week. And, a North Carolina elections worker has been indicted on charges she altered the voter registrations of roughly 250 convicted felons. Here are some of WFAE's afternoon headlines.

More than 30 people have been arrested in Raleigh during a protest staged inside the state legislative building. Meanwhile, the North Carolina redistricting case returns to the state Supreme Court.  And Mecklenburg County is releasing its proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year. Afternoon headlines on WFAE.

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