NC Voting Law

Michael Tomsic / WFAE-FM

Republicans in the North Carolina General Assembly are not ready to throw in the towel yet on efforts to overhaul state voting laws.

Democrats and liberal advocacy groups cheered the U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week not to review a lower court's ruling that struck down the 2013 election overhaul, but the victory may be short-lived. Republicans are considering whether to pass revised legislation that's scaled down and passes court scrutiny.

Hillary Clinton
Jeff Cravotta / WFAE

  Updated 5:05 p.m.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was in Charlotte Thursday for a midday rally at Johnson C. Smith University. She talked about college costs, voting rights, House Bill 2 and her differences with Republican Donald Trump.

Scott*/Flickr

A federal appeals court has struck down major parts of North Carolina's sweeping election overhaul. The three-judge panel ruled unanimously Friday the state's Republican lawmakers passed the 2013 changes with discriminatory intent.

After two weeks at trial, the state Friday could begin presenting its defense of North Carolina’s voting law. The Justice Department and other plaintiffs argue the law is discriminatory and suppresses minority participation in voting. But the architects of the law have yet to explain their motivation in court – and they don’t have to. WUNC’s Jeff Tiberii reports on the privilege many lawmakers are invoking.