NC voting

More than 30 people have been arrested in Raleigh during a protest staged inside the state legislative building. Meanwhile, the North Carolina redistricting case returns to the state Supreme Court.  And Mecklenburg County is releasing its proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year. Afternoon headlines on WFAE.

Michael Tomsic / WFAE-FM

Republicans in the North Carolina General Assembly are not ready to throw in the towel yet on efforts to overhaul state voting laws.

Democrats and liberal advocacy groups cheered the U.S. Supreme Court's decision this week not to review a lower court's ruling that struck down the 2013 election overhaul, but the victory may be short-lived. Republicans are considering whether to pass revised legislation that's scaled down and passes court scrutiny.

vote here sign
Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Updated 1:25 p.m.
The U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear an appeal seeking to reinstate North Carolina's controversial 2013 overhaul of voting laws, including  voter ID.  The decision lets stand a 2016 appeals court ruling that invalidated the law, saying it targeted African Americans.  Meanwhile, legislative Republicans are vowing to find another way revive an ID requirement for voting. 

North Carolina is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review a lower court ruling striking down the state's voter ID requirement and other election changes. Attorneys representing the state's Republican leaders filed their petition last week.

vote here sign
Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A federal judge late Friday ordered North Carolina to reinstate thousands of voter registrations that were canceled within the past three months. The North Carolina NAACP sued over the cancellations in three counties in the eastern half of the state. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been covering the case and joined Nick de la Canal for analysis.

Google Earth

A federal judge in Winston-Salem Wednesday said the state's process for handling challenges to a voter's registration "sounds like something that was put together in 1901." Judge Loretta Biggs had pointed questions about the cancellation of nearly 7,000 voter registrations in eight counties over the past two years. The North Carolina NAACP is suing North Carolina, and much of the focus is on recent cancellations in Cumberland and Moore counties. WFAE's Michael Tomsic was in the courtroom and joined Mark Rumsey to discuss.

What stood out?

Michael Tomsic / WFAE-FM

The North Carolina chapter of the NAACP filed a federal lawsuit Monday over the recent cancellations of up to 4,500 voter registrations. The NAACP says those cancellations in three eastern counties violate federal law. The state Board of Elections disagrees.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Early voting begins Thursday in Mecklenburg County and across North Carolina. Because of a federal appeals court decision, it's an earlier start this year than Republican lawmakers wanted.

Early voting cuts were part of a 2013 election overhaul the appeals judges described as "the most restrictive voting law North Carolina has seen since the era of Jim Crow."

UPDATE: The group of young voters appealed the federal district court decision to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. On Oct. 19, that court also denied the young voters' request to adjust early voting plans in five counties. 

In the fight over early voting in North Carolina, one of the things that stands out in a recent decision is who sat on the sidelines.

The U.S. Justice Department, the North Carolina NAACP and the state chapter of the League of Women Voters did not join a request to adjust early voting plans in five counties. Only one group of plaintiffs from the N.C. voting lawsuits made that request: young voters known as the Duke Intervenors. 

vote here sign
Jennifer Lang

African-American turnout, partisan politics and the threat of more lawsuits were all on the minds of North Carolina Board of Elections members yesterday. They set the final early voting plans for 33 counties that couldn’t reach their own agreement, including Mecklenburg.

Pages