NC Utilities Commission

dan river coal ash cleanup
David Boraks / WFAE

By EMERY P. DALESIO
AP Business Writer

Charging North Carolina consumers the full, multi-billion-dollar cost of cleaning up coal ash dumps is comparable to tire stores charging customers an extra fee to dispose of an old set of wheels, a Duke Energy Corp. executive said Monday.

Duke Energy and the state's utility consumer advocates have reached a partial agreement on a rate increase for eastern North Carolina that's lower than what the company originally sought. But Duke and the advocates are still haggling over how much consumers should pay for coal ash cleanups at Duke's North Carolina power plants and hurricane recovery costs.

NC WARN owns the solar panels it installed on Faith Community Church in Greensboro, and had been selling electricity to the church. But it has stopped the sales, after an order by regulators.
NC WARN

Updated 7:10 p.m.
A North Carolina environmental group is asking the NC Supreme Court to decide whether it's legal for it to install solar panels on a church rooftop, then sell electricity to the church.  NC WARN is appealing a 2-1 ruling against it last month by the NC Court of Appeals.

The proposed unit would add 400 megawatts of generating capacity at the plant near Denver.
Siemens

Duke Energy is asking state regulators for permission to expand its gas-fired turbine power plant in Lincoln County.  Duke says the project is needed to meet a growing demand for electricity during winter and summer months.  

Drawing shows design for the W.S. Lee Nuclear Plant in Cherokee County, S.C.
Westinghouse Electric Co./Duke Energy

North Carolina regulators want Duke Energy to account for what it has spent on a South Carolina nuclear power plant that is facing new doubts after the company that was supposed to supply the reactors filed for bankruptcy.

Illustration of Duke Energy's $1 billion project, which calls for two new gas-fired units in Asheville. The current coal-fired plant will be retired by 2020.
Duke Energy

 Updated 4:55 p.m.
Regulators have dismissed an appeal by two environmental groups that wanted to halt a Duke Energy power plant project in Asheville. The N.C. Utilities Commission says NC WARN and The Climate Times failed to post a $98 million bond required for the appeal.

But the battle may not be over. The environmental groups say they'll take the issue to the state Court of Appeals.  

A public hearing starts Monday in Raleigh on Duke Energy's planned acquisition of Piedmont Natural Gas. Approval by the North Carolina Utilities Commission is the deal's final hurdle. 

Duke announced last October it was buying Piedmont for $6.7 billion. That includes $4.9 billion in cash and taking over $1.8 billion in Piedmont debt. Piedmont has two things Duke wants:  

Duke Energy

State regulators will hold a hearing June 17 to help determine whether environmentalists should have to pay a multimillion dollar appeal bond before they challenge approval of a Duke Energy power plant in Asheville. 

NC WARN owns the solar panels it installed on Faith Community Church in Greensboro, and had been selling electricity to the church. But it has stopped the sales, after an order by regulators.
NC WARN

A Durham nonprofit says it has "temporarily suspended" sales of solar power on a church rooftop in Greensboro, complying with an order from state utility regulators last month.  

Duke Energy

North Carolina regulators have given Duke Energy the go ahead to build two new gas-fired electricity generating units in Asheville. The $1 billion project will replace an existing coal-fired plant on the site, which Duke plans to retire.

The approval came over the objection of environmentalists who argued that Duke overstated the need for a new plant in the North Carolina mountains.

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