NC Utilities Commission

Illustration of Duke Energy's $1 billion project, which calls for two new gas-fired units in Asheville. The current coal-fired plant will be retired by 2020.
Duke Energy

 Updated 4:55 p.m.
Regulators have dismissed an appeal by two environmental groups that wanted to halt a Duke Energy power plant project in Asheville. The N.C. Utilities Commission says NC WARN and The Climate Times failed to post a $98 million bond required for the appeal.

But the battle may not be over. The environmental groups say they'll take the issue to the state Court of Appeals.  

A public hearing starts Monday in Raleigh on Duke Energy's planned acquisition of Piedmont Natural Gas. Approval by the North Carolina Utilities Commission is the deal's final hurdle. 

Duke announced last October it was buying Piedmont for $6.7 billion. That includes $4.9 billion in cash and taking over $1.8 billion in Piedmont debt. Piedmont has two things Duke wants:  

Duke Energy

State regulators will hold a hearing June 17 to help determine whether environmentalists should have to pay a multimillion dollar appeal bond before they challenge approval of a Duke Energy power plant in Asheville. 

NC WARN

A Durham nonprofit says it has "temporarily suspended" sales of solar power on a church rooftop in Greensboro, complying with an order from state utility regulators last month.  

Duke Energy

North Carolina regulators have given Duke Energy the go ahead to build two new gas-fired electricity generating units in Asheville. The $1 billion project will replace an existing coal-fired plant on the site, which Duke plans to retire.

The approval came over the objection of environmentalists who argued that Duke overstated the need for a new plant in the North Carolina mountains.

Strata Solar

North Carolina energy regulators quietly released one of their most significant, long-awaited decisions of 2014, just as the year was ending. The state Utilities Commission had spent nearly the entire year re-evaluating the rules for solar energy. On Wednesday, the commission decided to leave substantially intact the rules which have underlied a solar energy boom in North Carolina.

The North Carolina Supreme Court is once again pondering how much you pay on your electric bill. The court heard oral arguments Monday about whether state regulators adequately considered customer finances when approving rate increases for Duke Energy in 2011 and 2013.


Duke Energy/Flickr

Duke Energy earned more than $600 million in its second quarter this year, 80 percent more than last year.


NC Utilities And Solar Developers Argue Over Price

Jul 7, 2014

Electric utilities and renewable energy developers are facing off this week in front of the North Carolina utilities commission over the price of renewable energy, and how much companies like Duke Energy should have to pay for it. The dispute has drawn in both national environmental organizations and Google.

Mike Linksvayer / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

North Carolina fell a bit in the most recent rankings of solar energy production across the nation but despite the dip, the solar landscape still looks strong, at least this year.


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