NC General Assembly

Mayor Jennifer Roberts
David Boraks / WFAE

Charlotte city officials say they're disappointed that lawmakers failed to repeal the state's controversial House Bill 2 during Wednesday's special session of the legislature. The repeal could come up again during the General Assembly's regular session next month, but some city council members aren't holding out much hope.

The Rev. William Barber, president of the North Carolina NAACP, held a fiery press conference Thursday morning during which he condemned two recent laws that dilute the power of the incoming governor, and in retaliation, called for possible legal action and for the National NAACP to approve an economic boycott of the state.

"It's not just about robbing a candidate or a governor," he said, "it's about robbing the people of their power."

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

It’s been another day of surprises with House Bill 2, Charlotte, and the city’s non-discrimination ordinance. The Charlotte City Council met again Wednesday morning to take action aimed at convincing state lawmakers to repeal House Bill 2.

That’s what council did Monday, too. Whether it’ll work still isn’t clear.

The General Assembly is meeting at this hour to discuss repealing House Bill 2, though the repeal effort was thrown into turmoil when rumors began circulating Tuesday that the Charlotte City Council had not fully repealed its entire nondiscrimination ordinance. WFAE’s David Boraks talks to host Nick de la Canal to help clear things up.

David Boraks / WFAE

North Carolina's political scene has been full of surprises lately, like last week's unexpected special legislative session to limit the governor's powers. This week, it was the Charlotte City Council's turn. Monday, the council unexpectedly repealed an ordinance expanding legal protections for LGBT people. Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks with WFAE reporter David Boraks, who’s been following the news out of both Raleigh and Charlotte.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts, Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles, Council member Julie Eiseldt
Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Governor-elect Roy Cooper says Republican leaders of the North Carolina General Assembly will call a special session Tuesday to repeal House Bill 2. That follows a surprise move from the Charlotte City Council, which Monday morning voted unanimously to repeal its own expansion of the city’s nondiscrimination ordinance. Joining host Nick de la Canal for more on this is WFAE’s David Boraks. 

Protesters disrupted the state House of Representatives in Raleigh again Friday morning, chanting "All political power comes from the people." It was the second day of protests during a surprise special session that includes bills to limit the powers of incoming Governor Roy Cooper.

Jayron32 of English Wikipedia

Plans by Republican lawmakers to limit the powers of incoming Governor Roy Cooper have drawn fire from Democrats. They call it a power grab and unconstitutional. But to others, it's all just part of North Carolina politics …  and history.

Governor-elect Cooper said in a press conference Thursday the legislature's moves are unprecedented. He even threatened a lawsuit.

“If I believe that laws passed by the legislature hurt working families, and are unconstitutional, they will see me in court,” Cooper said.

The General Assembly is still in Raleigh for an additional special session. Several bills offered by Republicans are aimed at limiting the powers of incoming Democratic Governor Roy Cooper. Republicans say what they're doing is constitutional.  Democrats call it a power grab. Cooper held a press conference this morning to say the proposals are unprecedented and will hurt North Carolinians. WFAE's Mark Rumsey talked to reporter David Boraks about the latest developments.

Public Domain


Updated 10 a.m.
In a flurry of filings Wednesday night, state lawmakers put forward more than two dozen bills to be taken up at an additional special session that opened Wednesday afternoon.  It's not clear how many will get hearings and pass the Republican-controlled legislature.  At least some appear aimed at handcuffing incoming Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper.  

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