NC Board of Education

The North Carolina Board of Education and the new state schools superintendent sat down this week for their first meeting. Republican Board Chairman Bill Cobey introduced his new GOP colleague. There was no hint that Johnson and the board are locked in a power struggle.

The disagreement is over which one of them is in charge of the Department of Public Instruction. Republican lawmakers say it's Johnson. The board says it's them. That struggle will begin playing out in court soon. WFAE's Lisa Worf joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry now. 

Courtney Mason in her classroom at Piney Grove Elementary.
Lisa Worf / WFAE News

Many teachers across the state are set to get belated Christmas gifts in the form of merit bonuses, pending a vote this week by the state board of education.

General Assembly members approved nearly $14 million last year to reward teachers whose students showed growth in third-grade reading and passed advanced placement and international baccalaureate exams.

Legislation that transfers power to the incoming superintendent of Public Instruction is on hold. The North Carolina Board of Education filed a lawsuit Thursday to invalidate that legislation. It was scheduled to become law Sunday, but a Wake County judge will hold a hearing on the lawsuit next Friday before deciding whether the law can take effect.

Before we get too far into the weeds, here’s something you need to know: The superintendent of Public Instruction is not the head of the Department of Public Instruction. The state Board of Education is in charge.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

North Carolina schools got their report cards Thursday, and for the most part, state standardized test scores are up slightly. That's true in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools as well.

classroom
woodleywonderworks / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

The North Carolina Board of Education did something unusual this month. It turned down five charter school applicants that had been recommended for approval. 

NC.gov

The North Carolina Board of Education got some notice this week for something it didn’t do. The board decided to delay forwarding a report on charter schools to state lawmakers. WFAE’s Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey in the studio to discuss.

Nearly thirteen percent of North Carolina third-graders were either held back or went on to fourth grade this year labeled retained. That means they get 90 minutes of concentrated reading instruction every day. 

These are the results from the first year of the state’s Read to Achieve program.  

Vice Chairman of the State School Board A.L. “Buddy” Collins said those struggling students will need extra support beyond third and fourth grade.  

Baddog_ / Flickr

Two virtual charter schools run by for-profit companies are trying to open schools in North Carolina. These would be the first online charters in the state.  A group appointed by the state board of education to help recommend rules for these types of schools is wrapping its work up. They completed their discussions this week.