Michael Bitzer

The general election is a little less than 90 days away after, well, some would argue this election season started four years ago. Perhaps our next guest would agree. He’s political science professor Michael Bitzer of Catawba College, and also WFAE’s political analyst. We’ll talk to him every Friday through the general election. He spoke to WFAE's Marshall Terry.

Michael Bitzer
WFAE

A federal appeals court had some strong language in last week’s decision that struck down North Carolina's 2013 voting law overhaul. The judges concluded that lawmakers had deliberately passed the law with the intent of curbing voter turnout among African-Americans. 

Sen. Bob Rucho, R-Mecklenburg, says the court should be "embarrassed" by that conclusion. He was one of the architects of the voting law.

Wednesday night, Governor Pat McCrory laid out his political priorities in the State of the State Address.  Michael Bitzer is a political scientist with Catawba College.  He joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry for his take on the speech.


Today is the first day of early voting in North Carolina for next month’s election.   Because of a law passed last year by Republicans in the General Assembly, the number of early voting days has been reduced.  The law also does away with same-day registration.  So, if you haven’t yet registered to vote, you won’t be able to cast a ballot this election.   Joining Morning Edition host Marshall Terry for our Thursday political chat is Catawba Science political professor Michael Bitzer.


It’s House Speaker Thom Tillis versus incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Kay Hagan in the general election. Tillis cruised to victory in the Republican primary, winning about 45 percent of the vote in the 8-person race. Catawba College political science professor Michael Bitzer joined us to talk about this race and other observations from the primary results.


Denise Cross Photography

Primary election day is this upcoming Tuesday, May 6, so today we discussed it with our political science professor, Michael Bitzer of Catawba College who also writes for our political blog the Party Line.


Now that we are entering the home stretch of the May primary election, we still seem to lack a true frontrunner in the GOP nomination contest for the U.S. Senate. 

While most polls show Thom Tillis, speaker of the NC House of Representatives, leading the field, the numbers across several different polls indicate a larger percentage of the potential electorate still has not made up their minds regarding the eight candidates.

WFAE's political analyst Michael Bitzer has been joining Morning Edition Host Duncan McFadyen most Fridays. He's a political scientist at Catawba College in Salisbury. They spoke on the final Friday before the November 2012 election to take one last look at various races in North Carolina.

There are different ways of looking at the possible electorate, based on past presidential elections. For example, North Carolina’s electorate might be reflective of the composition of registered voters in the state.

So let’s start with the 2004 election, when George W. Bush won the state by 13 percent—and was a continuation of what North Carolina had traditionally voted at the presidential level. As was evident in previous elections, North Carolina was a state where the Republicans won by double-digits over a series of elections, and was classified as “safe” GOP state.

The Week In Politics: Chicken, Polls, And Smartphone Apps

Aug 13, 2012

We heard a lot about chicken last week regarding the Chick-Fil-A and gay marriage. So, in response to that controversy, Public Policy Polling conducted a poll on chicken. The poll found that Chick-Fil-A is North Carolina's favorite fast-food chicken restaurant. It's preferred by 40 percent of voters. KFC is second at 23 percent, followed by Bojangles at 18 percent.

And, yes, there is an ideological split. Conservatives prefer Chick-Fil-A. Liberals prefer KFC.

Political analyst, J. Michael Blitzer, who's never chicken, joined Morning Edition host Duncan McFadyen to talk polls.