Michael Bitzer

Local News
11:43 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Looking Ahead To The General Election With Michael Bitzer

It’s House Speaker Thom Tillis versus incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Kay Hagan in the general election. Tillis cruised to victory in the Republican primary, winning about 45 percent of the vote in the 8-person race. Catawba College political science professor Michael Bitzer joined us to talk about this race and other observations from the primary results.

Listen to the discussion.

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Local News
10:36 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Republican Senate Candidates In The Home Stretch For Primary Next Week

Credit Denise Cross Photography

Primary election day is this upcoming Tuesday, May 6, so today we discussed it with our political science professor, Michael Bitzer of Catawba College who also writes for our political blog the Party Line.

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The Party Line
4:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

U.S. Senate GOP Runoff Looks Likely

Michael Bitzer

Now that we are entering the home stretch of the May primary election, we still seem to lack a true frontrunner in the GOP nomination contest for the U.S. Senate. 

While most polls show Thom Tillis, speaker of the NC House of Representatives, leading the field, the numbers across several different polls indicate a larger percentage of the potential electorate still has not made up their minds regarding the eight candidates.

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Election 2012
10:35 am
Mon November 5, 2012

The Week In Politics: Early Voting Ends, North Carolina Tight In Presidential, 8th District Races

WFAE's political analyst Michael Bitzer has been joining Morning Edition Host Duncan McFadyen most Fridays. He's a political scientist at Catawba College in Salisbury. They spoke on the final Friday before the November 2012 election to take one last look at various races in North Carolina.

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The Party Line
4:42 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Do Historic Voting Patterns Forecast 2012 Election?

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There are different ways of looking at the possible electorate, based on past presidential elections. For example, North Carolina’s electorate might be reflective of the composition of registered voters in the state.

So let’s start with the 2004 election, when George W. Bush won the state by 13 percent—and was a continuation of what North Carolina had traditionally voted at the presidential level. As was evident in previous elections, North Carolina was a state where the Republicans won by double-digits over a series of elections, and was classified as “safe” GOP state.

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