Mecklenburg County Commission

Ben Bradford / WFAE

The new session for the Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners kicked off Monday evening, but it was old divisions that dominated the meeting—starting with the election of the board’s chairman.

There are still major problems with new state software, which is supposed to speed up processing of government assistance claims.

In two weeks, the Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners will reconvene for a new session. Two new commissioners will sit at the dais at the Government Center, and they will need to pick a new chairman to lead them. The upcoming decision is reopening old wounds. 

Democrats will keep a 6 to 3 majority on the Mecklenburg County Commission. 

Michael Tomsic

Three at-large seats are up for grabs this election on the Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioners, which sets the county's budget and policies. Five candidates participated in a debate Tuesday at WTVI. One of the ways they differentiated themselves was on the referendum to increase the county sales tax.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

As of today, the Mecklenburg County government no longer oversees mental health, substance abuse, or disability services for the county. MeckLINK—the organization it built to handle those services—closed today, as the larger, outside agency Cardinal Innovations takes over. MeckLINK operated for little over a year, but that tenure spurred fights with state lawmakers for control, cost the county millions of dollars, and contributed to the fall of two top county officials.

Mecklenburg County government will continue to supplement state and federal Medicaid dollars for mental health services with its own money. The county has provided those funds for years, but their fate has been in limbo, as officials prepare to hand over mental health oversight to an outside organization.

The Once And (Potential) Future Brooklyn, Charlotte

Mar 24, 2014
Ben Bradford / WFAE

For much of the 20th century, the southeastern quadrant of Uptown Charlotte contained a bustling neighborhood known as Brooklyn. It formed because of segregation, but grew into the center of Charlotte’s black community.  Torn down and paved over, a vibrant Second Ward became a sleepy government district. But city leaders plan to revive the area through a new development that bears a familiar name, if they can get it off the ground.

Commissioners Interview County Manager Finalists

Dec 15, 2013

Mecklenburg County commissioners are closing in on a choice for county manager. The board interviewed finalists for the job in closed door meetings on Friday and Saturday at the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Government Center.

It’s becoming increasingly clear that Mecklenburg County won’t have a new manager until late December – or even early next year.

Before their regular meeting Tuesday, the county’s full board of commissioners apparently saw for the first time in closed session a whittled down list of three to five candidates selected by a search committee of four commissioners.