LGBT

Michael Tomsic

The Charlotte Chamber reports the number of businesses interested in Mecklenburg County has declined substantially. The reason? North Carolina’s controversial law affecting LGBT people. The Chamber is trying to increase pressure on state lawmakers and city council members to make changes.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Charlotte City Council last night was expected to cast a symbolic vote on whether to repeal recently-passed LGBT protections. Council approved those protections in February as part of an expansion of the city’s non-discrimination ordinance, but they were rendered moot by House Bill 2.

A symbolic repeal was portrayed as a way forward, a sign of good faith which would spur North Carolina’s Republican-dominated legislature to modify House Bill 2.

But the vote was pulled from the council agenda at the last minute. End of story, right? Not even close.

Federal officials issued a directive to school districts nationwide Friday saying they must treat transgender students according to the gender they identify with.  That brought another round of criticism from North Carolina officials, including Gov. Pat McCrory, who said federal agencies don't have the authority to decide school policies for bathrooms, locker rooms and other facilities.

Nick De La Canal / WFAE

The fight over House Bill 2 has moved from business boycotts and the court of public opinion to federal court.

On Monday, Governor Pat McCrory filed a federal suit against the U.S. Justice Department. The Republican leaders of the General Assembly filed their own suit against the DOJ shortly afterwards. In response, the DOJ filed its own suit against the state.

  Supporters and opponents of House Bill 2 both rallied near the legislature Monday, as lawmakers returned for the new session. And as they returned, four Democratic representatives introduced a bill to repeal the controversial law.

North Carolina General Assembly

 State Senate Leader Phil Berger says he doesn’t envision any changes to House Bill 2 during the short session that begins Monday, including one revision requested by Gov. Pat McCrory. He also said he’ll push for a 2 percent state budget increase, including another round of teacher raises. 

NC Government

Three weeks ago, Governor Pat McCrory signed House Bill 2 into law. At the time he wrote “this bill does not change existing rights under state or federal law.”

On Tuesday, McCrory walked back that statement a bit and is now calling for a section of the controversial law to be repealed. It’s all part of an executive order issued by McCrory. But in reality, the measure doesn’t accomplish all that much.

McCrory Issues Order To Clarify HB2

Apr 12, 2016

Update 4:50

Gov. Pat McCrory issued an executive order Tuesday that he says clarifies House Bill 2 and provides new protections for state employees based on sexual orientation and gender identity. 

McCrory signed HB 2 on March 23 after it passed in a one-day special session of the General Assembly. The law sought to overturn a new anti-discrimination ordinance in Charlotte, but went further, including provisions that exclude LGBT people from protection.

Jorge Valencia / WFAE

Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in downtown Raleigh Monday to show their approval of the controversial House Bill 2. It was the biggest public demonstration in support of a law that has garnered widespread criticism. WUNC's Jorge Valencia reports.

via Facebook

Two weeks ago, Gov. Pat McCrory stood with Mayor Jennifer Roberts at the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce to celebrate a big jobs announcement. PayPal was going to open a global operations center in Charlotte. The plan called for 400 jobs with an average pay of $51,000.

“North Carolina is the ideal destination for innovation-based, worldwide companies like PayPal," McCrory said at the announcement.

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