LGBT

Tom Bullock / WFAE News

Monday night, the Charlotte City Council will again discuss expanding the city’s non-discrimination ordinance to include protections for LGBT individuals. But the council will not vote tonight on the provision.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Later this month the Charlotte City Council is expected to do something it failed to do last year, expand the city’s non-discrimination ordinance to include protections for LGBT individuals. It was a contentious issue then, and remains one today. So, Monday night, the city tried something different. Something that relied on dialogue between those in the audience and dialogue from actors on stage.

Tom Bullock / WFAE News

There will be no meeting of the Charlotte City Council tonight. But the city will host a meeting about one of the most contentious issues in Charlotte, expanding the local non-discrimination ordinance to include protections for LGBT individuals. Last March, the Charlotte City Council voted down this expansion after a contentious meeting. There were protesters outside, and passionate speakers inside (you can find our coverage of the meeting here.)

David Boraks

Hillary Clinton says she would be willing to break up big financial institutions if the need arose.  The front runner for the Democratic presidential nomination spoke at a Democratic Party rally in North Charleston Saturday.  Meanwhile, more Carolinians are expected to travel this year for Thanksgiving, and they'll find much lower gas prices.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Same sex couples can continue to get married in North Carolina, after Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision, Obergefell v. Hodges. North Carolina has a ban on same-sex marriage in its constitution, after a voter referendum in 2012, but a federal judge in Asheville struck it down in October 2014.

Ludovic Bertron / Flickr

A small portion of a magistrate’s job in North Carolina is performing civil marriage ceremonies. A bill that’s already passed the Senate would allow state magistrates and register of deeds employees to “opt out” of this part of their job if it contradicts their religious beliefs. This is all part of a debate over same-sex marriage. The legislation could have other effects if it becomes law.

Several magistrates in North Carolina resigned last fall. They didn’t want to marry gay couples, so they quit, citing religious beliefs. That’s why Senate leader Phil Berger introduced this bill.


Charlotte City Council’s meeting Monday night over whether to include LGBT people in the city’s non-discrimination law evoked strong comments from the public and Council members. The proposal failed 6-5.

"I don’t think tonight’s vote is about solving a problem. I think it’s about promoting a political agenda," Republican Councilman Kenny Smith said before casting his vote against the measure. "I think if it's passed, it will be a clear message to the city that the City Council has voted to impose the progressive left's view of morality on the majority of our citizens."

Another council member who voted against the measure was LaWana Mayfield. Her vote may surprise some because she’s an openly gay member of Council. She voted no because the final proposal had stripped out a controversial requirement that would have allowed transgender people to use the bathroom of their choice.

In this interview, Mayfield tells WFAE's Sarah Delia that voting yes on the compromise "would have been compromising on all of the friends, the neighbors, those in the community that do identify as transgender…that would be telling them ‘You’re not worthy to be part of this fight with right now.’ ”

Tom Bullock / WFAE News

Monday night Charlotte’s City Council voted down a proposal to expand the city’s nondiscrimination laws to protect LGBT people. The vote was 6 to 5. It’s a major blow to LGBT rights advocates and a victory for those who saw the move as part of a war against religious freedom.

Lucy Perkins/WFAE

By a 6-5 vote, the Charlotte City Council rejected an expansion of Charlotte's non-discrimination ordinance. WFAE's Tom Bullock and Gwendolyn Glenn  covered Monday's meeting and protests. Both will have stories on Morning Edition.

Update: 10:00 pm

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

Crowds gathered early Monday evening outside the Government Center uptown to rally in favor of or to protest proposed changes to Charlotte’s non-discrimination ordinance. The measure would expand protections to include LGBT people in the city. The council is scheduled to vote on that issue later tonight. WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn spoke to Sarah Delia shortly before tonight's council meeting began.

Pages