Larry Kissell

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

  In the early 1940s, television audiences were entertained by the antics of the cantankerous television and cartoon moonshiner "Snuffy Smith." He was known for hiding his moonshine stills in the woods and making toe-curling white corn whiskey under the cover of night.

These days, no shoot-outs are called for because with the proper permits, moonshining is legal in North Carolina. The distillers are more sophisticated, such as a trio who worked for former North Carolina Congressman Larry Kissell. They opened a new distillery in Concord this year and are turning out moonshine while keeping in touch with their political roots.

Tanner Latham

North Carolina's new members of Congress will take the oath of office Thursday in Washington, including Republican Robert Pittenger who was elected to fill retiring Representative Sue Myrick's seat in Charlotte and Republican Richard Hudson who beat Larry Kissell to represent the 8th District.

Tasnim Shamma

Republican challenger Richard Hudson was all smiles last night in Concord. He could finally claim victory as the 8th congressional district's new congressman -- replacing Democrat Larry Kissell -- who was seeking his third term.

Even with early-voting results showing a big lead for Richard Hudson, the packed crowd at the Hilton Garden Inn ballroom waited more than two hours before Hudson claimed victory.

"Wow, look at this crowd," Hudson says. "Thank you so much. I'm just so honored by the tremendous support we've gotten from the district. What a great night, huh?"

Some NC Races Decided

Nov 6, 2012
www.PatMcCrory.com

Former Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory is now Governor-elect Pat McCory. He gave his victory speech around 9 p.m. shortly after receiving a concession call from Democratic opponent Walter Dalton.

“Our goal was not just to become governor and get elected to this great office. Our goal was to be governor to lead. That’s what we plan to do and we plan to start that work tomorrow,” McCrory said from a ballroom at the Westin hotel in Uptown Charlotte.

NC-8 Candidates Compete In New Territory

Oct 30, 2012
Julie Rose

Every ten years, the political party in power gets to redraw voting district lines in its favor. Republicans did it in North Carolina this year, leaving incumbent Democrats at a disadvantage in several Congressional races such as NC-8, where traditionally conservative portions of Rowan and Davidson Counties are now in the boundaries.

Running for Congress is tough as it is – you’re up for re-election every two years, which means you’re constantly campaigning and raising money.

Plus, most people in your district have no clue who you are.

Cabarrus County Democratic Chairwoman Grace Galloway admits she’s not happy with 8th District Congressman Larry Kissell and has not outright endorsed him. In response, members of the party's local executive committee wants to remove her from office. 

The Republican Party looks to North Carolina’s 8th Congressional district as an opportunity to grow its 50-seat advantage in the U.S. House. The race between Democratic incumbent Larry Kissell and Republican challenger Richard Hudson is considered one of the closest in the country.

Yesterday the two candidates met at Wingate University for their first debate of the 2012 election.

Congressman Kissell Will Debate Hudson Monday

Sep 22, 2012

Democratic congressman Larry Kissell and Republican candidate Richard Hudson will debate on Monday at Wingate University in partnership with AARP North Carolina. The focus of the debate is Medicare and Social Security and it's the first for North Carolina's eighth congressional district seat.  

“District eight, without a doubt, is one of the hottest seats that’s up for elections this year,” Doug Dickerson,  director of AARP North Carolina, says.

Dickerson wants Kissell and Hudson to talk specifics on key issues to senior citizens.