Keith Lamont Scott

On September 20, 2016, Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was shot and killed by a Charlotte Mecklenburg Police officer, also a black man. Protests and riots erupted in Charlotte following the fatal shooting. Here you will find WFAE's coverage of the shooting and its aftermath.

Memorial at apartment complex where Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot by CMPD police officer
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

A cell phone video has been released by the wife of Keith Lamont Scott before and after he was fatally shot by a Charlotte police officer earlier this week.


Shaun Corbett and fellow business owners and nonprofit leaders talked to reporters Friday afternoon outside his barber shop, Da Lucky Spot, on North Tryon Street.
David Boraks / WFAE

The police killing of Keith Scott on Tuesday and nightly protests since then have hit Charlotte’s black community hard. People are dealing with anger, fear and concern about the community’s long-term challenges.

WFAE reporter David Boraks went to a press conference on North Tryon Street with black business owners Friday afternoon. The event was organized by Shaun Corbett, whom some people may know as the leader of a group called Cops & Barbers.

Boraks talked with All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.  Listen to their conversation here. 


On Friday afternoon, WFAE aired an hour long special discussing the video released by Keith Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott.

Joining Mark Rumsey were WFAE reporters Tom Bullock and Gwendolyn Glenn and Charlotte School of Law professor Jason Huber. Included in the special were interviews with former Charlotte police chief Darrel Stephens, Charlotte city councilwoman Vi Lyles, and Stephen N. Xenakis, M.D. Brigadier General (Ret), retired general and Army psychiatrist.

City of Charlotte

On the local news round-up, protests turn violent in the aftermath of the fatal shooting of an African-American man by police. Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf is skewered on Capitol Hill by the Senate Banking Committee over the bank’s sales practices. The City Council rejects suggestions they repeal their bathroom ordinance in exchange for an HB2 repeal – and that’s playing a role in the Gubernatorial Race. Those stories and more, this week on the local news roundup.

Jay Price

In wake of the police shooting of Keith Scott a third night of protests went more smoothly as National Guard members helped Charlotte police maintain control.

Jay Price / WUNC

CMPD and the City of Charlotte have put into place a curfew between and midnight and 6:00 a.m. It begins tonight and will last until the state of emergency is lifted.

Demonstrators have gathered in Uptown Charlotte tonight, sending a message against police violence.   The action comes two nights after the Tuesday killing of Keith Scott by a CMPD officer.  

Michael Tomsic / WFAE

Updated Friday, 4:30 a.m.
The family of Keith Scott wants the public to see videos of Scott being shot and killed by police Tuesday.  Members of the Scott family viewed dash-cam and body camera videos of the shooting Thursday. 

The family's lawyers issued a statement afterward, saying the videos raise more questions than answers. They say it’s impossible to tell from the videos, "what, if anything," Scott was holding when officer Brentley Vinson shot him in an apartment complex near UNC Charlotte.

The shattered windows of an Uptown store.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Some uptown businesses are cleaning up Thursday afternoon. That’s after rioters smashed windows and threw trash cans during the second night of anger over the fatal police shooting of an African-American man.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

Wednesday night’s protests in uptown Charlotte over a fatal police shooting began with a peaceful rally at Trade and Tryon streets. But then the crowd went in different directions: Some wound up listening to speeches of unity at an uptown church as others confronted police.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why. 

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