Keith Lamont Scott

On September 20, 2016, Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was shot and killed by a Charlotte Mecklenburg Police officer, also a black man. Protests and riots erupted in Charlotte following the fatal shooting. Here you will find WFAE's coverage of the shooting and its aftermath.

www.liberty.edu

The Charlotte police officer who fatally shot Keith Lamont Scott last week has a short personal history with CMPD but a long family one. WFAE's Michael Tomsic has been researching officer Brentley Vinson, who, like Scott, is African-American. He joined Mark Rumsey to discuss what we know.

Cincinnati skyline
Public Domain

An African-American man is shot and killed by police. Days of protests and riots follow. Police don riot gear and fire tear gas. Calls for Queen City officials to resign follow. But that queen city was Cincinnati and the year was 2001. We hear from Cincinnati’s mayor at the time about their experience to see what we can learn here. Then, how police reforms around the country are panning out.

CMPD hasn't released all the body and dash cam video tied to the shooting of Keith Scott.  But we have a better idea of how much exists - another 2 hours and 2 minutes. WFAE's David Boraks reports in this segment with All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey.

Courtesy of NCleg.net

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police have released some of the body and dash cam video of the police shooting of Keith Scott. They had the discretion to do that. But come Saturday, that will no longer be their call to make. A new law will require a court order to release that type of video. State Representative Allen McNeill, a Republican from Asheboro, is the primary sponsor of the law.

The bill has been the target of renewed criticism as calls intensified for CMPD to release video of the Scott shooting, but McNeill says critics are misinformed.

One week ago on September 20, CMPD officer Brentley Vinson shot and killed Keith Lamont Scott. WFAE’s David Boraks and Tom Bullock join All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey to talk us through what we know and still don’t know about the case.

Charlotte Mecklenburg police

Charlotte Observer

Charlotte-Mecklenburg police have identified the man who was video taped being beaten, kicked and stripped of pants by 10 attackers in the EpiCentre garage during the height of uptown protests Wednesday.

The man’s name has not been released, but police say he is cooperating in helping to identify the attackers. It remains unclear if the man is a Charlottean or was visiting the city when the beating occurred.

Gwendolyn Glenn

Thunderstorms doused demonstrations uptown Monday night but many residents upset over the fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott last week by a CMPD officer dressed down city officials at last night’s City Council meeting. They called for the resignations of the mayor, council members and chief of police.

One of the darkest weeks in Charlotte’s history continues.  On Friday, the wife of the man who was shot and killed by police released her own video of the altercation. Over the weekend, CMPD released their videos. This incident has shaken Charlotte and North Carolina to its core, severely tarnished the image of the city in the national media and raised serious questions on many fronts.  We continue to explore all of this.

cornhole tailgating
David Boraks / WFAE

City officials declared Sunday’s Panthers-Vikings football game an "extraordinary event." That meant lots of police downtown and extra security measures. There was a small protest, but most people welcomed the distraction after a week of unrest.

Charlotte Fatal Police Shooting Protests Remain Nonviolent Saturday Night

Sep 25, 2016
Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

Peaceful protests over a fatal police shooting of a black man continued throughout the day and into the night Saturday in Charlotte, even as police released videos of Tuesday’s fatal encounter.

Meanwhile, early Sunday, the city declared the Panthers game an “extraordinary event” meaning extra security is on the way. The game against the Minnesota Vikings is set for 1 p.m. at Bank of America Stadium; protesters were expected to be at the stadium.

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