immigration

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The Trump administration is catching heat from both Republicans and Democrats in North Carolina who say the government should not be separating migrant children from their families at the border.

Late spring is graduation season for schools across the United States. It's a time of joy and hope for many, but for DACA recipients and their families it can bring added anxiety. For many of these "DREAMers," the threat of deportation looms over their graduation celebrations.

NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Jessica Moreno-Caycho, a DREAMer graduating this May from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Moreno-Caycho said she came with her family to the United States from Peru in 2003. She was 8 years old when she arrived.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

As Garry McFadden gets ready to take over the Mecklenburg County Sheriff’s Office, a spokesman for the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement has a warning for him. If McFadden follows through on a campaign promise to end the county’s participation in the controversial 287(g) program, there could be ramped up activity on the part of ICE.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

If you've been keeping up with the news in Charlotte, you've probably encountered the term "287(g)."

It refers to the 287(g) program, a voluntarily partnership between the Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which has become a controversial sticking point in the upcoming May 8 primary for Mecklenburg County sheriff.

If you're not too clear on what the program is, here's a basic primer.

Nick de la Canal/ WFAE

The Mecklenburg County Sheriff is defending his participation in a federal program that allows deputies to help enforce federal immigration law. The program, known as 287g, has become a sticking point in the sheriff’s upcoming bid for re-election.

JOHN MOORE / GETTY IMAGES

The Trump administration is taking steps to limit who gets asylum in the United States, and immigration lawyers are warning that thousands of people who fled violence and persecution in their home countries could be turned away.

Sen. Thom Tillis spoke during debate on the budget agreement Thursday.
C-SPAN

Members of Congress from the Carolinas were divided, mostly along party lines, when they voted early Friday on a 2-year federal budget agreement. The bill was signed into law by President Trump.  

Jose Hernandez-Paris of the Latin American Coalition spoke at a press conference near the Charlotte office of Sen. Thom Tillis Tuesday.
David Boraks / WFAE-FM

President Trump's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA, brought a range of reactions in North Carolina. Congressional Democrats called it a betrayal and cold-hearted. Republicans applauded, though they disagree on how far to go with a law to replace DACA. Immigrant advocates hope for a compromise to help DACA's so-called "dreamers." 

North Carolina General Assembly

Updated 4:54 p.m.
North Carolina Senator Thom Tillis is applauding the Trump administration's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA. Tillis said Tuesday morning it should be up to Congress to set a long-term policy on the status of immigrants who arrived as children.

Yency Contreras
Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney says he's struggling to recruit Latinos and other Spanish-speaking officers, as the city's Hispanic community grows. It’s now about 13 percent of the population, but only about 6 percent of CMPD’s 1,900 officers are Latino.

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