I-77

Traffic safety experts will study crashes along I-77 north of Charlotte, where workers are building toll lanes. The state Department of Transportation also says it’s considering changes in the work zones, including lower speed limits.

The National Weather Service has confirmed a tornado did strike southwest Charlotte this week. The service says the tornado hit Wednesday evening with maximum winds of 90 miles per hour, causing damage along a 1.5 mile stretch of John Price Road, and along a 0.5 mile stretch from Microsoft Way to West Arrowood.

I-77 toll lanes map at I-277.
I-77 Mobility Partners

Toll-lane construction has been going on for a year now on I-77 from Huntersville to Mooresville. Now it's starting on the stretch of I-77 near uptown Charlotte. That means lane closures and traffic shifts ahead.

Maps show a change in Pat McCrory's support in Mecklenburg County between 2012 and 2016. Red is Republican (McCrory) and Blue is Roy Cooper (Democrat).
N.C. State Board of Elections

Democrat Roy Cooper is claiming victory in his bid to unseat Governor Pat McCrory, though results aren’t final. If he loses, the governor can trace the defeat in part to Mecklenburg County. Changing voting patterns and his stand on controversial issues, including I-77 tolls, have eroded the former Charlotte mayor’s popularity at home. 

Charlotte's roads are jammed, but the McCrory administration says the state's new road funding formula will help.
David Boraks / WFAE

House Bill 2, Voter ID and coal ash cleanups are headline-grabbing issues in the governor’s race. Roads? Not so much. But the McCrory administration is touting success in changing the way North Carolina builds roads.

David Boraks / WFAE

  The head of the NCDOT says a bill canceling a contract for toll lanes on I-77 north of Charlotte could cost the state $800 million - and may not prevent the state from using tolls. The cost includes cancellation penalties as well as money for the DOT to complete the project by itself.  

http://www.ncdot.gov

Updated Thursday, 4 p.m. 

The state House of Representatives on Thursday approved a bill calling on NCDOT to cancel the I-77 widening project north of Charlotte. The bill now goes to the Senate, where Senate leaders have said they don't see a need to cancel the project.

Gov. Pat McCrory and the DOT have said they're committed to the $650 million contract with I-77 Mobility Partners, a subsidiary of Spain-based Cintra. The company started grading and other work last November.

Updated 5:35 p.m.
State Rep. Charles Jeter of Huntersville says he’ll file a bill when the legislature’s short session opens Monday to cancel the NCDOT’s contract to add toll lanes to I-77. But Senate Leader Phil Berger said later he doesn't see any need to do that. 

Jeter says he promised to file the bill back in January when he urged Charlotte City Council to oppose the contact with Spain-based Cintra. The council reaffirmed its support, despite an outcry against tolls from the Lake Norman area north of Charlotte.

NCDOT

I-77 Mobility Partners plans to start construction Monday on the project to add high-occupancy toll lanes on I-77 between uptown Charlotte and the Lake Norman area. The project includes proposed noise walls along sections of the highway. WFAE’s Duncan McFadyen reports people who own property close to the walls will get another say in whether or not they’re built.


David Boraks / CorneliusNews.net file photo

Some state lawmakers are stepping up efforts to halt the construction of toll lanes on I-77 north of Charlotte, as construction begins Monday. They called on Governor Pat McCrory Friday to cancel the project, but he wasted little time in rejecting the idea.  

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