House Speaker Bobby Harrell

bobbyharrell.com

South Carolina law enforcement is releasing some details of the investigation that eventually resulted in the fall from grace of former South Carolina House Speaker Bobby Harrell. Harrell resigned a month ago after pleading guilty to six campaign finance violations.

In February 2013, South Carolina's state law enforcement division began an investigation into then-House Speaker Bobby Harrell. The state attorney general's office asked the division, called SLED, to look into several complaints from the president of a watchdog group. 

bobbyharrell.com

Suspended South Carolina House Speaker Bobby Harrell has pleaded guilty to six campaign finance violations and agreed to resign from office. 

Harrell accepted a plea deal Thursday that lets him avoid jail time. Instead, he will have six years in prison suspended as long as he completes three years of probation. He was also fined $30,000, ordered to turn over about $10,000 remaining from his campaign account to the state and will pay $93,000 to South Carolina's general fund. 

bobbyharrell.com

A grand jury indicted the South Carolina Speaker of the House Wednesday on nine charges that include corruption and ethics violations. The indictment is the latest in a months-long legal battle that's involved the South Carolina attorney general and the state Supreme Court.

www.judicial.state.sc.us/supreme

The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that South Carolina’s attorney general does not need permission from lawmakers to prosecute a lawmaker. The Supreme Court overturned an earlier decision that said Attorney General Alan Wilson had overstepped his authority in trying to prosecute House Speaker Bobby Harrell.


www.judicial.state.sc.us/supreme

The South Carolina Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether Attorney General Alan Wilson has the authority to prosecute House Speaker Bobby Harrell. A state judge ruled last month that Wilson cannot prosecute Harrell before the House Ethics Committee determines there's a criminal case.

South Carolina's attorney general plans to appeal a ruling that says he needs to go through lawmakers if he wants to prosecute a lawmaker. The case revolves around allegations that state House Speaker Bobby Harrell used his office for personal gain.


In South Carolina, a judge ruled Monday that state Attorney General Alan Wilson overstepped his authority in trying to prosecute South Carolina Speaker of the House Bobby Harrell. The judge ruled that ethics complaints must go through a legislative committee first.


South Carolina's attorney general has brought a criminal case before a grand jury against the state Speaker of the House. But the question before a judge right now is whether the attorney general needs to get permission from state lawmakers to prosecute one of their own.

Former South Carolina attorney general Charlie Condon never imagined that his office would need the OK from lawmakers to prosecute alleged criminal behavior.