Honey bees

honeybees
Amy Rogers / WFAEats

George McAllister has the best-smelling basement in all of Charlotte. That’s where he extracts honey from his backyard hives – and invites other beekeepers to join him – on his annual honey harvest day each summer. It’s an awfully sticky business with a pretty sweet result, which we’ll describe in a moment. Until then, just imagine breathing in soft air that’s scented with candles made of sugar and the fragrance of a million flowers.

drawing of a painting from the caves of Cueva de la Arana
fr:Utilisateur:Achillea [GPL (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Around 8,000 years ago, when Stone Age humans hunted woolly mammoths, they also dug into rock crevices and climbed trees in search of wild honey.

How can we possibly know this, without the written language that wouldn’t be developed for at least 2,000 years?

A cave painting near Valencia, Spain, shows a prehistoric hunter bravely pulling honey from a tree hive while angry bees swarm all around.

The Health Of The Honeybees

Apr 15, 2015

What's happening to all the honeybees? It's a question we've been asking now for years and finding an answer is essential to the health of our environment, food supply and the economy. Honeybees are crucial in pollinating fruits, vegetables and nuts and their numbers have been declining sharply in recent years - about 30 percent of all colonies have died every winter in the U.S. since 2007. The alarming declines are causing many concerns and some are calling it a wake-up call for the U.S. and world. Most recently, President Obama announced a task force of various agencies to create a federal strategy to promote the health of honeybees and other pollinators. We'll talk about the importance of bees, theories about what's happening to them, check in on the health of our local bee populations, explore the implications for agriculture and the economy and find out what we can do in our own backyards.

Health Of The Honeybees

Jul 24, 2014
BotheredByBees / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

What's happening to all the honeybees? It's a question we've been asking now for years and finding an answer is essential to the health of our environment, food supply and the economy. Honeybees are crucial in pollinating fruits, vegetables and nuts and their numbers have been declining sharply in recent years - about 30 percent of all colonies have died every winter in the U.S. since 2007. The alarming declines are causing many concerns and some are calling it a wake-up call for the U.S. and world. Most recently, President Obama announced a task force of various agencies to create a federal strategy to promote the health of honeybees and other pollinators. We'll talk about the importance of bees, theories about what's happening to them, check in on the health of our local bee populations, explore the implications for agriculture and the economy and find out what we can do in our own backyards.

Loss Of Pollinators

Sep 4, 2013
Derek Keats / Flickr

We know the world is a giant ecosystem and that we are interconnected with plants and other animals in the food chain. Perhaps the most important connection between man and animals is through pollination. Many of our major crops rely on pollinators to help crop species thrive. Bees, butterflies, other insects and larger animals play crucial roles in the pollination process but bees are disappearing in alarming numbers. Our panel will help us understand the pollination process and the mystery of the disappearing honey bees.