Higher Education


Central Piedmont Community College is developing a new program to train people to develop anti-counterfeit printing.


Central Piedmont Community College will have a new president for the first time in more than two decades. Tony Zeiss, who led the college through a period of significant growth, announced his retirement yesterday.

UNC Greensboro

Back in 2010, the University of North Carolina Greensboro rolled out a program for students who want to earn a bachelor’s degree in three years or less. A growing number of students is taking advantage of it. 

college class
SMBCollege / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

During the Great Recession, 48 states cut spending on higher education, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. That funding has not rebounded. North Carolina colleges and universities lost 25 percent in state funds since 2008. South Carolina schools lost about 40 percent. To make up for those cuts schools are charging students a variety of special fees.

The Cost Of Higher Education

Sep 1, 2014

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Among the 16 campuses in the UNC system, tuition and fees for in-state students have nearly doubled in the last decade. WFAE News is exploring the topic all week and we join the effort to find out why college costs so much.  

Nick de la Canal/WFAE

Six years ago, a group of young women were picked to take part in a special program. The girls were all in the seventh grade, all were Latinas, and all were deemed to be at risk of dropping out of school or becoming pregnant. The program is run by a volunteer group called Circle de Luz. And last week the group – and the young women they mentored – had reason to celebrate

Wingate University President Will Retire In May 2015

Apr 22, 2014
Courtesy of Wingate University

Wingate University President Jerry McGee is stepping down in May 2015. 

McGee has served as president of the Union County school for more than 22 years and oversaw major changes during his time as University president – including its transition from a college to a university.


Johnson C. Smith University has received about $1 million this month for a scholarship fund that helps students pay the difference between their financial aid and tuition.

Courtesy of Belmont Abbey College

Belmont Abbey College is taking a step toward a financial model where tuition alone covers operating expenses.  Belmont Abbey’s President Bill Thierfelder says the college will cut $1 million in administrative costs to get closer to that goal. 

He says right now the college like many others spends too much on departments that tend to function in their own silos. 

Tasnim Shamma

Johnson C. Smith University President Ron Carter is urging the Department of Education to reconsider changes to the Federal Parent PLUS loan. Carter blames those changes for the school's recent three million dollar budget cut.