Health

Health
1:35 am
Wed September 11, 2013

SC Suspends License Of Fort Mill Midwife Center

Carolina Community Maternity Center
Credit carolinasbirthcenter.com

A Fort Mill birth center in which midwives deliver babies remains closed one week after South Carolina’s health department suspended its license.

The health department won’t comment on its investigation, but a statement from Carolina Community Maternity Center says the suspension occurred after a mother had to be rushed to a hospital and the birth resulted in, quote “a bad outcome.”

Read more
Charlotte Talks
9:00 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Living With Arthritis

Swelling and deformity of the DIP joint - the end joint of the finger. This is the most common place for osteoarthritis in the hand.
Credit handarmdoc / Flickr

Arthritis is a painful and persistent condition that affects millions of Americans every day. Over 300,000 children in America suffer from juvenile arthritis and there are over 100 forms of arthritis. According to the CDC, arthritis and rheumatic conditions cost the U.S. economy $128 billion annually and result in 44 million outpatient visits and 9,367 deaths each year. But what exactly is arthritis? What causes it? Is it hereditary? And are there diet and lifestyle choices that may help control the symptoms of arthritis? We talk with a few key experts, about living with and managing arthritis, when Charlotte Talks Monday, Sept. 9. 

Read more
Local News
9:21 am
Fri August 30, 2013

A Convoluted Appeals System For Mental Health Patients

Last year, North Carolina changed how it provides mental health care for those on Medicaid. The state put 11 regional organizations, called MCOs, in charge and gave them less money to work with. So, cuts to care were expected.

About half of these MCOs, including MeckLINK in Charlotte, have denied upward of 20 percent of requests for care, according to self-reported data from the organizations. Patients can appeal, but North Carolina has made the process far more difficult.


Read more
Local News
9:16 am
Tue August 13, 2013

Frustrations With MeckLINK Grow As Denials For Care Increase

A slide from MeckLINK's June presentation to the Mecklenburg County Commission. It shows the decline in Intensive In-Home Treatment, an expensive treatment, where mental health workers visit a child at home or school.
Credit Mecklenburg County

Mecklenburg County’s mental health patients are being denied care they have grown accustomed to, after a statewide reorganization cut money available for Medicaid mental health. Mecklenburg County set up the agency, MeckLINK, to manage the remaining funds. The agency's officials blame the state for cutbacks, but providers say denials to patients for service exceed the amount cut by the state.

Read more
Local News
6:28 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Health Insurance Coming To A Strip Mall Near You

Soon you'll be able to shop for books, shoes, video games – and health insurance – all in the same shopping center. Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina is opening retail stores in a handful of strip malls.


Read more
Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Fat Activism

Ragen Chastain
Credit Richard Sabel

More than two-thirds of North Carolina adults are overweight or obese, and our state has waged a war against fat with the Eat Smart Move More campaign and its obesity prevention plan. But not everyone agrees with this. "Fat-activism" - It’s a growing movement of fat people and "fat-supporters" who say It is possible to be both fat and healthy. Programs that target and shame obese people can lead to unfair discrimination in the workforce, the schoolyard, and even in the medical field. The American Medical Association listed obesity as a disease last month, but these activists say "weight" and "heath" are two separate things. Will the push for fat-acceptance help reduce discrimination and bullying, or could it lead to a society of overweight Americans? We’ll speak with two “fat-activists” as well as a kinesiologist to find out more when Charlotte Talks.

Read more
Non-Profit
5:11 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

'Solace' For Afghani Kids In Lake Norman

Twelve-year-old Menhajuldin (Menhaj) Shadab will take back photos of his time in Lake Norman, North Carolina to Kabul, Afghanistan.
Tasnim Shamma

This week, about 20 kids from Afghanistan are flying back home after spending six weeks in the Lake Norman area. They were here to get medical treatment they otherwise would not have received. Some have sustained war wounds from roadside bombs and others suffer from chronic illness. While here, the kids stay with host families.


Read more
Local News
5:02 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

N.C. Legislature Passes Bill To Make Health Care Costs More Transparent

North Carolinians should soon have an easier time understanding their medical bills and comparing the cost of common procedures at different hospitals. Those are among the goals of legislation the General Assembly passed Thursday.


Read more
Local News
8:21 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Surviving Cancer As A Child And Battling The Effects Decades Later

Charles Landis shows the X-ray of his upper right arm from when he was 6 years old.
Michael Tomsic

Almost all children who survive cancer have at least one chronic health condition when they’re adults, and those conditions are often serious and undiagnosed.

Those are among the findings of a study that St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital released this summer. Some of the survivors who took part in it live in the Charlotte area.

Charles Landis still has the X-rays from when he was six years old. At his house in Cornelius, he pulls one out of a folder.

“This is an old X-ray from 1977,” Landis said.     

Read more
Local News
5:20 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

UNC Doctor Says Cancer Drug Makers Need To Reveal Side Effects

Cancer drug makers should do a much better job explaining how their new products will impact patients' symptoms and quality of life. That's the message from a UNC doctor in a recent online piece in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Dr. Ethan Basch of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center says whenever he meets with patients, one of their first questions is about how a certain drug will make them feel. 

Read more

Pages