Health Insurance

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There is now a disincentive for health insurance navigators to set up shop in rural areas. Navigators are those specially trained people that help consumers sign up for health insurance on the marketplace. The Trump administration has tied their funding to how many people they sign up for coverage on the marketplace. Since chances are higher of signing up more people in urban areas, navigators in South Carolina are focusing on cities at the expense of rural areas.

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It is unclear how many North Carolinians would be left uninsured under the updated Senate health bill. It was estimated that an earlier version of the bill would increase the uninsured population across the country by 22 million over the next decade.

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The 12th Congressional District, which encompasses most of Mecklenburg County, stands to have the most people in the country lose health care coverage under the Senate plan to replace Obamacare – that’s according to the Center for American Progress, a left-leaning think tank. About 200 people concerned about those coverage losses attended a town hall Monday night hosted by Congresswoman Alma Adams.

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North Carolina consumers who purchase their own health insurance will pay more next year. The State Department of Insurance approved average rate increases of between 10 and 33 percent. 

Carolinas Healthcare System and UnitedHealthcare have come to terms on a new contract. The agreement means that most UnitedHealthcare customers in the Charlotte metro area will continue to receive “in-network” coverage for services provided at CHS facilities.

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North Carolina has the fourth-highest percentage of people whose Medicare Advantage plans will no longer be offered next year, according to a report from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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People looking to buy health insurance through the North Carolina exchange may soon have another company to choose from. UnitedHealthCare plans to offer federally-subsidized coverage in the state starting next year.


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In the Carolinas, November was a far better month than October for the federal marketplace that's part of the Affordable Care Act. That's according to data the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released Wednesday.


By now you probably know that President Obama has offered a temporary fix for people whose health insurance companies have canceled their policies because they didn’t meet the minimum standards of the Affordable Care Act. You can keep your policies for another year if insurance companies are willing to still offer the plans, and if state insurance regulators are OK with it. North Carolina Insurance Commissioner Wayne Goodwin says he is. He joined President Obama and other insurance commissioners at the White House this week, and he joined WFAE's Kevin Kniestedt on Morning Edition.


North Carolina insurance regulators say they plan to expedite the rate review process in order to prevent thousands of state residents from losing their individual health plans.  Insurers were terminating those policies because they don’t meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act.  But President Obama pledged this week to allow people to hold onto their current policies for another year. 

North Carolina Insurance Commissioner Wayne Goodwin says usually the whole review takes several months, but his office will only have a few weeks to go through the plans.  

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