NC Candidates Begin Filing For Office

Feb 12, 2018
Candidates and their supporters pack the Mecklenburg County Board of Elections on Monday, the first day of the filing period.
Michael Falero

The filing period for candidates running for local and state races this November started Monday.

A federal court's decision to strike down North Carolina's map of congressional districts has cast uncertainty over this year’s elections.

Federal judges ruled Tuesday that the boundaries drawn by Republican legislators constitute an illegal partisan gerrymander.  The judges gave lawmakers about two weeks to come up with a new map.


The federal judges relied heavily on the findings of Duke University mathematics and statistics professor, Dr. Jonathan Mattingly.  He used computer programming and an algorithm to create thousands of simulated congressional districting plans for North Carolina. 

Michael Bitzer

In what may be a landmark decision, a federal panel of judges has ruled all of North Carolina's congressional districts are illegal partisan gerrymanders.

They've banned the map from being used in this year's election and ordered the General Assembly to draw new districts by 5pm on January 24th.

Lawmakers are expected to appeal the ruling.

The North Carolina Legislative Building
Jmturner (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

This year's congressional election has just been thrown into chaos.

Late Tuesday, a panel of federal judges ruled unanimously that all of North Carolina's election districts for the U.S. House of Representatives are illegal partisan gerrymanders. All 13 districts must now be redrawn just weeks before the campaign season officially kicks off with candidate filings.


The fate of North Carolina's new legislative maps is now in the hands of a federal court. A ruling could come at any time.

But in a new twist in this long-running case, the judges signaled they may be willing to do something the plaintiffs explicitly did not ask for and state lawmakers do not want.


A panel of federal judges again heard arguments about race, redistricting and North Carolina’s legislative maps on Thursday.

But this time, not the old maps, but the new ones drawn up by the General Assembly in September. All Things Considered Host Mark Rumsey talks with WFAE’s Tom Bullock who was at the hearing.


On Thursday, a panel of federal judges will convene in Greensboro to hear the latest round of arguments in a redistricting case which has already worked its way up to the U.S. Supreme Court and back.

A trio of federal judges is gathering in two weeks to decide whether North Carolina lawmakers removed unlawful racial bias from new legislative district maps.

The judges on Wednesday set a hearing for Oct. 12 in Greensboro to decide if the new districts lawmakers drew for themselves still contain illegal and unconstitutional districts.

North Carolina Legislative building
jmturner / Wikimedia Commons

Republican leaders of the General Assembly have just one more week to finish and approve new district maps for the state. This by order of a federal court.  

Alex Olgin / WFAE

Voters around the state told lawmakers what they think of newly-drawn legislative districts Tuesday.  The maps released late last week were drawn to comply with a Supreme Court order that found 28 state legislative districts were illegal racial gerrymanders.