gentrification

The old Hercules Industrial Park off Statesville Avenue is up for redevelopment.
David Boraks / WFAE

WFAE has a new initiative called Ask Us to let our audience suggest story ideas. On our website, we're asking what you're curious about in the Charlotte region, its life, and culture. We recently put another set of five questions to a vote – letting you decide the story you wanted us to cover. The winner came from Steve Tekola, of east Charlotte. He talked to WFAE's David Boraks.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Charlotte’s city council members gave a thumbs down to a proposed mixed-use development in the historically African-American Cherry neighborhood.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Charlotte is changing. What else is new, right?

The city’s population is now above 800,000. Mecklenburg County’s population has doubled in the last 25 years to more than 1 million people today.

But change is about more than the growing numbers of people. Properties change hands and so does their value. Buildings get torn down.

Sometimes, the entire fabric of a neighborhood changes – and the people who lose out the most are the ones who can least afford it. Today, WFAE begins a periodic series in which we’ll visit neighborhoods going through change, big and small. Our series is called Block By Block.

Cherry Rezoning Stirs Old Fears, Mistrust

May 16, 2014
Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

The Charlotte City Council’s decision to rezone nearly 6 acres near uptown has highlighted along-runningfear among African-American residents that they will be pushed out by gentrification.