Film

NC History Museum Tries Crowd Funding For Film Exhibit

Oct 18, 2013
N.C. Museum Of History

The North Carolina Museum of History is trying something new to raise money: crowd-funding. The museum launched an online campaign this month to help pay for an upcoming exhibit about the history of film in North Carolina. The publicity for the exhibit comes at a good time for supporters of the state’s tax incentives for movie and TV productions.  

    

Light Factory Members Want To Keep Independence

Oct 17, 2013
MichaelKuhn/Flickr

Charlotte’s Light Factory museum is no longer looking to merge with other area organizations.

The museum of photography and film announced last week that it was suspending operations while it tries to reorganize. The museum's board chairman Jeff Wise says a merger was a possibility but museum members want it to remain independent.

The Light Factory To Suspend Operations

Oct 8, 2013
MichaelKuhn/Flickr

Charlotte’s Light Factory museum celebrated its 40th anniversary last year. Now it’s closing its doors, at least temporarily.

The museum of photography and film announced Monday it’s suspending operations.

Board chairman Jeff Wise say revenue has dropped 30 percent in the last three years. He says the museum needs time to reorganize.

WFAE’s Public Conversation on the local film industry provided insights into how movies, television shows and commercials are cast, shot and produced in the Charlotte area.   Panelists and audience members also discussed how the film industry impacts the region’s economy.  And the forum explored contrasting views on North Carolina’s financial incentives for the film industry.


Paying For Film, Part 3: How NC Compares

Aug 29, 2013

Thirty productions claimed tax credits last year for filming in North Carolina, including some blockbusters like Iron Man 3 and the Hunger Games. Charlotte has become home to a couple of successful TV shows: Homeland and Banshee. By all accounts, the Hollywood business is booming here. But there's a dark cloud on the horizon – come the end of next year, North Carolina's film incentives program is set to expire. 

That prompted WFAE to take a close look at what filming brings to the state, and what it costs us to get those films here. Our two part series wrapped up Thursday morning and WFAE reporter Julie Rose joined host Mark Rumsey to answer a few questions.


Paying For Film, Part 2: What We're Spending

Aug 29, 2013

One billion dollars.  That's what production companies have spent filming in the state since 2007.   

Now here's another number: $100 million.  That's about how much the state has paid those companies in incentives in that time. 

Good deal, right? Spend $100 million to get one billion?  But there's more to the story.


Paying For Film, Part 1: What We're Getting

Aug 28, 2013

In the last few years, two major television series have made Charlotte their home and the Hunger Games was the biggest blockbuster ever to set up in the region. All that has heightened interest in the debate over whether to extend North Carolina's film incentives. They expire at the end of next year. 

But neither side is spinning the full story of these incentives, so WFAE begins a two-part series to explain. 


homelandincharlottenc.com

Several years ago North Carolina lawmakers introduced a large tax incentive package that they hoped would lure the movie industry back to the state. By any anecdotal measure the incentive is a huge hit. Charlotte is home to several national shows and the region and state have seen some of the largest films in Hollywood come here for production. Millions and millions are spent in the state but critics say the numbers are not what they seem. So is the booming film industry in our state worth the incentive? We'll examine that question and look at a rapidly growing independent film industry in our state, when Charlotte Talks.

It's summer movie time, which means big stars, big thrills and big box office blockbusters - at least the studios hope so. This time every year, we invite local film critics Matt Brunson and Sean O'Connell to talk about the summer's biggest movies - which ones to catch and which ones to avoid. Whether you're looking for superheroes in Iron Man 3 and Man of Steel, fast cars in Fast & Furious or some throwback SciFi in Star Trek, we'll cover them all. And you can't talk blockbusters without talking about those larger-than-life action sequences - so we've invited the visual effects supervisor for Iron Man 3 to explain how these effects work and the history of special effects in film, when Charlotte Talks.

Julie Rose / WFAE

Charlotte taxpayers spent $13 million last summer to buy the deserted Eastland Mall. The city council will vote Tuesday night on spending another $800,000 to tear the mall down. City leaders are hopeful the demolition will make way for new life on the blighted block.


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